Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

University of Delaware

 

Student Friendly Course Descriptions

 

Level 200 and Above – Fall 2015 Courses

 

 

 

 

 

Arabic

 

 

Chinese

 

Classics

 

FLLT/CMLT

 

 

 

 

German

 

 

Hebrew

 

Italian

 

Japanese

 

 

Portuguese

 

 

 French

 

Russian

 

Spanish

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arabic

 

 

 

ARAB  205:  Arabic Conversation    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ikram Masmoudi

 

 

 

 

 

Focuses on improving oral communication skills through discussion of various topics related to modern social and cultural life in the Arab world. Includes grammar review and writing practice.

 

 

Prerequisite: ARAB 200

 

 

 

Chinese

 

 

 

CHIN  200:  Chinese Grammar and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Haihong Yang

 

 

 

 

 

This course aims at a further development of all four language skills which the students have acquired from the 100-level CHIN courses. In particular, the course emphasizes a further study of advanced Chinese grammar and basic essay writing. In this course students will not only learn authentic Chinese in terms of idiomatic usages, familiar sayings, and sophisticated grammar structure, but get to know Chinese society and culture as well. By the end of this course, students should have commanded around 250 new words and/or phrases in order to engage in a linguistically and culturally sophisticated communication in Chinese.

 

 

Prerequisite: CHIN 107

 

 

 

CHIN  204:  Chinese Calligraphy    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Maria Tu

 

 

 

 

 

This course introduces students to the rich art of Chinese calligraphy. Students will first learn how to use brush pen to practice Chinese calligraphy after learning Tai Chi and meditation. Students will learn basics of Chinese painting and be able to pain simple objects such as insects, fish, and flowers.

 

 

 

CHIN  350:  Business Chinese    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Renee Dong

 

 

 

 

 

This advanced intermediate Chinese language course prepares students for effective communication in casual and formal business settings. While systemically providing trainings in all four aspects of language study (listening, speaking, reading and writing), this course has a strong emphasis on fluency in listening and speaking and focuses on the practical and functional use of the language. The students will practice language use and functions in common business situations, conduct company case analysis and review business news reports. As culture and context are critical for successful foreign language learning, this course also incorporates information about Chinese business culture and etiquette to promote socially appropriate language use.

 

 

 

CHIN  467:  Readings in Chinese Literature I    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Haihong Yang

 

 

 

 

 

This course is Part One in the CHIN467 series. The course introduces students to representative works in Chinese culture and literature. It focuses on cultural tradition(s), literary conventions and innovations, genres, and major cultural movements. The course has a two-fold purpose: help students obtain an advanced ability to read Chinese cultural and literary texts in their richness and complexity, and acquaint them with a basic knowledge of Chinese literary writing. The course will be conducted in Mandarin Chinese.

 

 

Honors section available.

 

 

 

Classics

 

 

 

LATN  201:  Greek Tragedy    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Margaret Laird

 

 

 

 

 

Love and lust; murder and madness; violence and vengeance; incest and incantations; witches and warriors; prophets and princes; gods, ghosts, and goddesses…ancient Greek tragedy has all this and more.

 

 

This course is a survey of ancient Greek tragedy and the society that produced it. Among the topics covered will be: the cultic origins of theatrical performances, the nature of Greek theaters and ancient theatrical production techniques, religion and drama, women in tragedy, tragic heroism, myth and tragedy, and the relation of tragedy to (ancient) contemporary politics.

 

 

Plays to be read include the Bacchae, Medea, Oedipus the King, and Antigone.

 

 

There are no restrictions and no prerequisites for this course.
It fulfills the “Group A” requirement.

 

 

 

FLLT

 

 

 

FLLT  321:  Anti-heroes in Modern Chinese Literature    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jianguo Chen

 

 

 

 

 

This course introduces students to the image of anti-heroes in modern Chinese literature, a counter-tradition endemic to the heroic discourse in the main stream of Confucian orthodoxy and the ideology of socialism. Through studying the literary representation of various types of anti-heroes: the aesthete, the self-abandoned, the marginal woman, the estranged, the defeated, the superfluous, the social outcast, etc., the course examines the trajectory of a modern anti-hero literature, one that was born of modern Chinese writers’ endeavor to search for an individual “self” vis-à-vis a collective identity. The course demonstrates how the sociopolitical conditions of modern China have shaped this anti-hero literature and how societal transformations have yielded value alternatives. The comparative perspective the course adopts will enable students to have a better understanding of how the literary representation of anti-heroes is historicized and contextualized. Selected films will be shown to complement and enhance such study.

 

 

The course satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences ‘Group A’ requirements.

 

 

 

FLLT  322:  Greek Tragedy    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Annette Giesecke

 

 

 

 

 

Love and lust; murder and madness; violence and vengeance; incest and incantations; witches and warriors; prophets and princes; gods, ghosts, and goddesses…ancient Greek tragedy has all this and more.

 

 

This course is a survey of ancient Greek tragedy and the society that produced it. Among the topics covered will be: the cultic origins of theatrical performances, the nature of Greek theaters and ancient theatrical production techniques, religion and drama, women in tragedy, tragic heroism, myth and tragedy, and the relation of tragedy to (ancient) contemporary politics.

 

 

Plays to be read include the Bacchae, Medea, Oedipus the King, and Antigone.

 

 

There are no restrictions and no prerequisites for this course. It fulfills the “Group A” requirement.

 

 

 

FLLT  345:  Modern Israel: History and Culture    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Eynat Gutman

 

 

 

 

 

Interested in the study of modern Israel's history and culture? This course will enlighten you in many ways: what are the origins of Zionism? Who is an Israeli Sabra? How did factors and events like the Holocaust and the Arab-Israeli conflict shape the Israeli society of today? Taught in English, the course will address such questions: through historical background and the study of film, literature and music, we try to arrive to an understanding of this complex culture. The course focuses mainly on the period around 1880s-1980s.

 

 

No knowledge of Hebrew is required; the course is taught in English.
This course fulfills a group B requirement.
Cross-Listed: JWST 345
An Honors option is available.

 

 

 

FLLT  352:  Videogames and Latin American Culture    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Phill Penix Tadsen

 

 

 

 

 

This course explores the relationship between videogames and culture by analyzing both in-game cultural representation and the real-life economic, political and societal effects of games across Latin America. Although this region may not be the first to come to mind when thinking of videogames, an examination of Latin America’s diverse contexts offers a unique view of how products of “global” media are transformed by local and regional practices particular to the multiple markets in which those media circulate. This course focuses on an explanation of key concepts for understanding the relationship between culture and games, including the effects of gameplay, spatialization and algorithmic structure on videogames’ meaning, as well as the social, political and economic implications of videogames as a cultural phenomenon.

 

 

Section satisfies the University multicultural requirement.

 

 

 

FLLT  360-080:  Japanese Visual Culture: manga, anime and games    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Rachael Hutchinson

 

 

 

 

 

This course examines the dynamic visual culture of contemporary Japan through the media of manga (Japanese comics), anime (animation) and videogames, also considering how Japanese media are interpreted, consumed and analyzed in North America. The course is split into three parts, each analyzing a different medium, although the intertextuality of these media will be emphasized throughout the course.

 

 

Restrictions: Freshman Honors Colloquium
Pre-requisites: None

 

 

 

FLLT  375:  Topics in Russian and Soviet Culture: The Russian Peasant    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Julia Hulings

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know that Russians won’t whistle inside the house? Or that they won’t give watches as gifts? What is the real significance of the summer dacha? To ever gain insight into the Russian “soul,” one must first attempt a foray into the heart of the peasant himself. Trace the image and treatment of the Russian peasant in literature, art, and politics from the dawn of Kievan Rus’ through the Stalinist era of collectivization and eventual fall of the Soviet Union. Through short literary texts, actual pieces of public policy, and works of art, we will see how the Russian upper classes, government, and socially conscious writers dealt with the “peasant problem.” Begin with key aspects of the peasant world, such as Orthodox Christianity, pagan superstition, and the unique institution of the mir. Continue with an overview of Russian serfdom from its inception until the Emancipation of 1861 and its consequences. Explore the 19th-century debate between the Slavophiles and Westernizers, the effects of the revolutions of 1905 and 1917, and finally the results of policies developed and enforced under the Soviets. Join us and get in touch with your inner peasant!

 

 

The course is conducted entirely in English.
Satisfies Group B “History and Cultural Change”
Prerequisites: None

 

 

 

FLLT  424/624:  Second Language Testing    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jorge Cubillos

 

 

 

 

 

This course is designed to provide future language teachers with the knowledge and skills required to develop a variety of classroom assessment methods. Participants will learn how to implement multiple formal and informal techniques to evaluate their students' progress, and how to use test results to improve instruction. Special emphasis will be given to the design of comprehensive assessment plans for specific thematic units.

 

 

 

FLLT  467:  Language Syllabus and Materials Development    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ali Alalou
Cynthia Lees

 

 

 

 

 

Wondering how to select a textbook, or how to put together the syllabus for your next language course? Interested in creating your own teaching materials? This course will give you the opportunity to learn about the latest approaches to syllabus and materials design, while giving you extensive hands-on experience in the creation of your own classroom tasks and homework assignments.

 

 

The Internship centers on a 25-hour placement in an area school, potentially the one in which the candidate will complete the student teaching assignment. At intervals throughout the semester, the University Internship Supervisor visits the candidate at the observation site to discuss the placement. Meetings are also convened on campus to provide effective strategies for communicative language teaching.

 

 

Prerequisites: FLLT 421
Open only to Foreign Language Education majors in their senior year.

 

 

 

French

 

 

 

FREN  200-010/080:  French Grammar and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cynthis Lees

 

 

 

 

 

This course provides a comprehensive grammar review, as well as an exploration of more advanced structures, in conjunction with an introduction to reading skills and strategies. Students complete grammar exercises, build vocabulary, respond to comprehension questions on the readings, and write short essays in order to improve their language skills. The reading material will consist of modern short stories, and film will also be incorporated.

 

 

Prerequisite: FREN 107
This course may be taken for honors credit.
It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course
have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.

 

 

 

FREN  205:  French Conversation    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Edgard Sankara

 

 

 

 

 

This course is designed to help students improve their oral proficiency in French through discussions, debates, role-plays and short oral reports. Emphasis will be on vocabulary-building, as well as providing tools for managing conversations. Articles from French newspapers and magazines as well as video clips from current French broadcasts will be used to further develop students’ knowledge of contemporary France and the Francophone world, and improve their reading comprehension skills. Some grammar review may be included when needed.

 

 

Prerequisite: FREN 107 with a B or any 200-level French course taught in the French language.
May be taken for Honors credit.

 

 

 

FREN  211-010/080:  French Reading and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cynthia Lees

 

 

 

 

 

This course includes reading and discussion of French literature and the writing of short papers. The emphasis of the course is on improving critical reading skills and on writing formal analyses of literature. Students will be introduced to several literary movements. Honors credit involves supplementary readings, papers and meetings outside of class with the professor.

 

 

Satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences Group A breadth requirement.

Prerequisites: FREN 200 with a minimum grade of C or FREN 107 with a minimum grade of A-.
FREN 211 is required as a prerequisite for FREN 301 or 302.

It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course have earned grades of A or A- in previous coursework.

 

 

 

FREN  211-011/081:  French Reading and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Judy Celli

 

 

 

 

 

This course introduces students to the reading and discussion of French literature and the writing of short papers. The emphasis of the course is on improving critical reading skills and on writing formal analyses of literature. Students will be introduced to several literary movements and will review grammatical structures.

 

 

Prerequisites: FREN 200 (minimum grade of C) or FREN 107 (minimum grade of A-) or FREN 112 (minimum grade of A-)
Honors Section meets with the regular section.
Honors credit involves supplementary readings, papers and meetings outside of class with the professor.

 

 

 

FREN  301-010/080:  Introduction to French Literature: Prose    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cynthia Lees

 

 

 

 

 

A knight, Yvain, and his faithful lion right wrongs, protect damsels, and slay evil opponents; two giants, Gargantua and his son Pantagruel, engage in bizarre battles and drinking bouts in one of the great comic masterpieces of French literature; a seraglio, eunuchs, and two Persian noblemen, Usbek and Rica, fill the pages of a work that encapsulates the revolution in human thought of the Age of Enlightenment; and a young woman and her father engage in the passionate pursuit of love and money with resulting tragedy for all involved. A GPS that navigates the prose fiction and non-fiction of major French authors from the Middle Ages to the present, this course expands and consolidates written and oral language skills through a close reading and discussion of the texts. Topics include identity, social transformation, gender, class, borders, and disorders. At the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of French culture and society, to analyze critically, and to discuss representative works of French literature.

 

 

Prerequisites: FREN 211, and any 200-level course taught in the French language, both with a suggested minimum grade of B-.
This course may be taken for Honors credit; an A or A- in previous French coursework for those pursuing Honors credit is recommended.
Satisfies Group B Arts and Science breadth requirement.

 

 

 

FREN  326:  French Civilization II    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Edgard Sankara

 

 

 

 

 

A study of French cultural history from the French Revolution to 1945.

 

 

Did Marie Antoinette really say “Let them eat cake?” In which ways was Napoléon’s “Code civil” unkind to women? How did the Impressionists get their name? If these questions (or their answers) intrigue you, or if you’re simply interested in broadening your knowledge of French history and cultural history with a view to trying out for JEOPARDY, this may be just the course for you! French 326 traces the development of French civilization from the Revolution to the conclusion on World War II. A discussion of the French history of this period will be supplemented by slides, literary readings (poems, short stories, excerpts of longer works), and films (four out-of-class films are obligatory).

 

 

Prerequisite: Any two 200-level French courses.

 

 

 

FREN  458/658:  Francophone African Cinema    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Edgard Sankara

 

 

 

 

 

"Is Tarzan an African movie star? What does it mean to have “African eyes” when talking about African cinema? How about “cinema calebasse” is it a cinema about calabash or is it something else? Do you know who is Sembène Ousmane to African cinema?

 

 

This course focuses on the cinemas of Francophone Africa from the 1960s to the present. We will begin with an examination of the early Western filmic representations of Africans as savages devoid of culture and history. We will then proceed to examine how African filmmakers have challenged and refocused those images by creating new depictions of their societies, and offering Africa through African eyes. In our study of African cinema, we will closely examine both the themes in the films and the way the films are constructed in order to try to understand the narrative and political goals of African filmmakers. We will explore the social, historical, and political contexts of these films as well as examine each of them closely to better understand their aesthetic and narrative characteristics. This course will also cultivate understanding and appreciation of local frameworks of knowledge and of recent theoretical developments in film studies. Finally, we will discuss issues and theories related to the definition of the so-called third world cinema, third cinema, postcolonial cinema, and postmodern cinema."

 

 

 

German

 

 

 

GRMN  205:  German Conversation    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ester Riehl

 

 

 

 

 

When you are trying to improve your conversation skills, reading can help you increase your vocabulary, but can it help you speak better? What you really need to do is listen to conversations. In this course, we will do that, using recent German films as our texts. Learn about German culture as we watch these films, learn the necessary vocabulary in order to talk about them, and discuss them in class. Films include: Das Leben der Anderen (East Germany), Das Wunder von Bern (soccer), Merry Christmas (WWI) and others. Vocabulary and conversation stand at the center of this course, but grammar review will be included as necessary. Grades will be based on class participation, quizzes, an oral midterm and final exams.

 

 

Prerequisite: successful completion of GRMN 107 or the equivalent
Not intended for students who have already completed German courses at the 300-level or above

 

 

 

GRMN  211-010:  German Reading and Writing    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Claudia Biester

 

 

 

 

 

This course was designed to help students read German with greater ease and appreciation. In order to build confidence gradually, we’ll begin with very short stories, progressing step-by-step to longer ones. We’ll also work with contemporary music and videos. On occasion, we’ll review selected aspects of grammar. Students will write several short essays, and take a midterm and final exam

 

 

This course fulfills an Arts and Sciences ‘Group A’ requirement.
Prerequisite: German 107 or equivalent
Not intended for students who have already completed German courses at the 300-level or above

 

 

 

GRMN  355:  Love, Money and Power    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ester Riehl

 

 

 

 

 

What motivates the action in German literature? How has that changed over the centuries? In this course we will consider why the era of “modern” German literature is said to have begun 250 years ago, and how many of the topics and concerns of the authors and their characters in German drama, prose and poetry between the late 18th and early 20th centuries have remained relevant since then. The goals of the course are to provide students with an overview of German literature and culture from the18th to the 20th century, improve their German skills and learn how to do close reading. Students will write several short papers, two essays, and a midterm and final exam.

 

 

Prerequisite: any two 200-level courses taught in German.

 

 

 

GRMN  455:  Narratives of the Nation    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Monika Shafi

 

 

 

 

 

More than 25 years ago, the Berlin Wall came down and within a year Germany was united and the former German Democratic Republic ceased to exist. More than a generation separates us from these eventful days and months but they continue to influence contemporary German national debates and identity. In this course we will examine several literary texts and films, which address German Reunification as well as globalization and its impact on today’s German culture. The works selected encompass authors and directors from West and (former) East Germany, who offer widely different interpretations of Germany past and present. We will discuss topics such as German national identity, the role of memory and German history, migration and the new youth (pop) culture. Students will be required to write several short assignments, two essays, and take three tests.

 

 

Prerequisite: two 300-level German courses

 

 

 

Italian

 

 

 

ITAL  200:  Italian Grammar Review    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Laura Salsini

 

 

 

 

 

You want to learn a second language, but you're afraid of being bored. Then take this opportunity to change your opinion! You will be engaged in learning Italian and its grammar through short stories, films, debates and many other activities. This course is a great way to review the fundamentals of the language and fine tune your communication skills.

 

 

Prerequisite: ITAL 107
Honors credit available

 

 

 

ITAL  205:  Italian Conversation    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Laura Salsini

 

 

 

 

 

You're so close to proficiency in Italian! Consolidate your hard-earned language skills through conversation and oral presentations, with grammar review and written work when appropriate. Students will discuss current events along with material from films, the Internet and other sources. Have fun while improving your speaking skills!

 

 

Prerequisite: ITAL 107
Honors Credit Available

 

 

 

ITAL  211:  Italian Reading & Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Riccarda Saggese

 

 

 

 

 

Let the masters of the Italian short story teach you how to write! This courses emphasizes vocabulary acquisition and written expression. Students will read and discuss short works of literature and film. You will improve your writing skills, add to your rich stock of conversation topics in Italian, and begin your love affair with contemporary Italian authors.

 

 

Prerequisite: ITAL 200, ITAL 205, or ITAL 206
Honors Credit Available
Counts as Group A course

 

 

 

ITAL  310:  Survey of Italian Literature    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Meredith Ray

 

 

 

 

 

You enjoy the language, you are interested in Italian culture, and Italy fascinates you. You are now ready to explore Italy's literary past and acquaint yourself with some of the country's great masters and masterpieces. Through the study of selected works and authors, you will also gain a better understanding of Italy's history and culture. This course will be taught through a combination of informal lectures and discussion.

 

 

Prerequisites: Ital 211 or Ital 212
Honors credit available
Counts as Group B

 

 

 

ITAL  355:  Literature and the Sea    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Riccarda Saggese

 

 

 

 

 

This course will focus on different authors whose works have represented the sea both as a metaphorical “monster” who eats his voyagers and as a “mother” who treats the waves like children, bringing them to a safe harbor. An overview through the centuries of Italy’s most famous literary masterpieces will be presented. Emphasis will be placed particularly on the works of Dante Alighieri, Ugo Foscolo, Giovanni Verga, Salvatore Quasimodo, Leonardo Sciascia and Alessandro Baricco, all of whom have written about the dangerous fury and the infinite sweetness of the sea.

 

 

Prerrequisites: Ital 310 or Ital 311
Honors credit available

 

 

 

ITAL  401:  Advanced Italian Grammar and Stylistics    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Laura Salsini

 

 

 

 

 

In this course students will practice and apply what they have learned in previous classes, as well as broaden their vocabulary through different kinds of writings (i.e.: summaries, opinion papers, narrations, feature articles, descriptions, Wikis, etc.), projects and class participation. We’ll also read some wonderful texts to use as a basis for our class discussions and writing projects.

 

 

Prerequisite: Any two Ital 300- level courses.
Available for Honors credit

 

 

 

Japanese

 

 

 

JAPN  200-010/080:  Japanese Grammar and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Mutsuko Sato

 

 

 

 

 

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed JAPN107, and any 200 level course. The course objective is to review and expand the knowledge of grammar forms at the Japanese intermediate level and to learn to correctly use those grammar forms in compositions. By the end of the course, students are expected to be able to organize their thoughts through a traditional Japanese logic structure and to express their thoughts through written Japanese.

 

 

Prerequisite: JAPN107 or any of 200 level course
Textbook: Nihon bunka wo yomu for elementary/intermediate level

 

 

 

JAPN  201-010/080:  Advanced Intermediate Japanese I    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Chika Inoue

 

 

 

 

 

This course covers the first six chapters of Genki II text book. Students learn to use various grammatical forms to convey different nuances. Classes are conducted mostly in Japanese. Activities include oral, reading and writing exercises on various topics. About 90 additional Kanji will be introduced.

 

 

Prerequisite: JAPN107.
Textbook & Workbook: Genki II (Cahpters 13-18)

 

 

 

JAPN  202-010/080:  Advanced Intermediate Japanese II    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Chika Inoue

 

 

 

 

 

This course covers the last five chapters of the Genki II textbook. Students learn to use various grammatical forms to convey different nuances. Classes are conducted in Japanese. Activities include oral presentations and essays on various topics. About 75 additional Kanji will be introduced.

 

 

Prerequisite: JAPN201 or 206.
Textbook: Genki II (Chapters 19-23)

 

 

 

JAPN  301:  Advanced Japanese Grammar    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Mutsuko Sato

 

 

 

 

 

This is a course designed for students who want to achieve a higher level of fluency. The goal is a more natural and native-like use of the language, both in written and oral forms. New grammatical forms, idiomatic and set phrases, Kanji, and vocabulary are introduced. Topics include Japanese geography, technology, foods, pop culture, and education system. There is a final project designed by each student.

 

 

Prerequisite: successful completion in three 200-level Japanese courses or equivalent.
Textbook: TOBIRA: Gateway to Advanced Japanese (Chapters 1,3,5,7)

 

 

 

JAPN  455-010/080:  Advanced Japanese Literature    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Rachael Hutchinson

 

 

 

 

 

Students acquire skill in reading works from modern Japanese literature in the original language, and learn how to discuss literature in Japanese – in written essays, informal class discussions, and formal oral presentation. Building on skills from JAPN355 and other 400-level courses, students read texts of greater length and complexity. Texts include short stories by Murakami Haruki, excerpts from Tezuka Osamu’s autobiography, miscellanies by Endō Shūsaku and the beginning of a Natsume Sōseki novel. Class work includes reading the Japanese text aloud and offering a translation, with discussion of the text’s meaning and significance in Japanese. Each student will be encouraged to find their own interpretation of the text and will have the opportunity to share their thoughts with the class. Honors students will also be able to pursue their own research interests with regard to Japanese literature.

 

 

 

Latin

 

 

 

LATN  201:  Greek Tragedy    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Margaret Laird

 

 

 

 

 

Love and lust; murder and madness; violence and vengeance; incest and incantations; witches and warriors; prophets and princes; gods, ghosts, and goddesses…ancient Greek tragedy has all this and more.

 

 

This course is a survey of ancient Greek tragedy and the society that produced it. Among the topics covered will be: the cultic origins of theatrical performances, the nature of Greek theaters and ancient theatrical production techniques, religion and drama, women in tragedy, tragic heroism, myth and tragedy, and the relation of tragedy to (ancient) contemporary politics.

 

 

Plays to be read include the Bacchae, Medea, Oedipus the King, and Antigone.

 

 

There are no restrictions and no prerequisites for this course.
It fulfills the “Group A” requirement.

 

 

 

Portuguese

 

 

 

PORT  216:  Intensive Brazilian Portuguese for Spanish Students and Speakers    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cynthia Schmidt-Cruz

 

 

 

 

 

Study the language of Brazil and unlock the door to this exciting giant of South America. Learning Brazilian Portuguese may not change your life, but then again, maybe it will. Why take a chance?

 

 

Due to their similarities in structure and vocabulary, your knowledge of Spanish will put you on the fast track to learning Portuguese. In this intensive course you can expect to gain a good functional knowledge of this language, which is spoken by 230 million people. You will also learn about Brazilian culture, and Brazilian popular music will be incorporated into our lessons to reinforce language learning. Come prepared to groove to Bossa Nova and other Brazilian rhythms, and to have fun learning a really cool language!

 

 

Prerequisite: One 300-level Spanish course or being a heritage speaker of Spanish.
Note: As a beginning language course, PORT 216 is not intended for native or heritage speakers of Portuguese.

PORT 216 is part of Option II of the Spanish major and can count toward the Latin American and Iberian Studies major and minor. It is also part of the Foreign Language Certificate in Brazilian Portuguese. Portuguese can be used as Language Three for the Three Language Major. Additionally, this course helps students prepare for the winter session in Brazil where they can continue studying Portuguese.

 

 

 

Russian

 

 

 

RUSS  305:  Russian Conversation and Composition through Cinema    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Staff

 

 

 

 

 

This course explores modern Russian culture and society through the prism of Russian cinema. Students will watch, discuss, analyze, and write about some of the best known Soviet and post-Soviet films, starting with Aleksandrov’s 1936 propaganda vehicle «Цирк» and ending with «Восток-запад», the 1999 exposé of Stalin’s rule and the cold war. Other films include the prize-winning and heart-rending film about World War II «Летят журавли», the much-loved comedies «Иван Васильевич меняет профессию» and «Ирония судьбы» and the anti-war classic «Кавказский пленник». In the process, students will advance their skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. A diverse array of lexical, grammatical, and creative exercises will speed students’ progress toward higher linguistic proficiency.

 

 

Prerequisite: Any 200-level RUSS course.
Honors credit available.

 

 

 

RUSS  401:  Advanced Russian Grammar and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Julia Hulings

 

 

 

 

 

Improve your knowledge and understanding of Russian through the examination of key aspects of contemporary culture and society such as education, politics, ecology, and the Russian perception of Americans. Authentic readings from contemporary sources and related listening, speaking, and writing activities will help you to develop and express your own opinions in clear, colloquial standard Russian. Each topic is accompanied by advanced exercises in Russian grammar, syntax, and word usage, with detailed attention paid to participial constructions, gerunds, verbs of motion, aspect, word order and exceptions to rules. Special emphasis will be given to Russian word formation as essential to vocabulary building. This course will answer many of your unanswered questions about Russian; no stone will be left unturned!

 

 

Prerequisite: any 300-level RUSS course
Honors credit available.

 

 

 

Spanish

 

 

 

SPAN  200:  Spanish Composition and Grammar    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Hans-Jörg Busch
Lee Glen
Fatima Haq

 

 

Meghan McInnis-Dominguez

 

 

 

 

 

An intensive study of selected grammatical topics (ser-estar, preterite and imperfect, present subjunctive and commands); vocabulary; grammatical exercises and short compositions. Offered with an Honors section (080).

 

 

In this course you will acquire new vocabulary, broaden and improve your knowledge of grammatical structures (agreement, verb tenses, pronouns, and much more). You will learn strategies for developing and refining your written communication skills.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 107
Honors Credit Available

 

 

 

SPAN  201:  Spanish Reading and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jesus Botello
Cristina Guardiola
Meghan McInnis-Domini

 

 

Susan McKenna

 

 

 

 

 

This course places major emphasis on the development of reading, writing and analytical skills while studying literary selections from Spain and Latin America.

 

 

In this course the student has the opportunity to read a wide variety of Spanish and Latin American literature in three genres: poetry, narrative and drama. The student will develop reading skills as well as a solid knowledge of the literary terms and movements which will be encountered in more advanced literature classes. Compositions will be based on interpretation of the readings and will be directed towards reinforcing the use of literary terminology.

 

 

This class may contain a section with an Honors component. Honors students may be asked to participate in weekly discussion threads through Canvas, memorization of poems, and/or a short drama performance.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 200

 

 

 

SPAN  205:  Spanish Conversation: A Cultural Approach    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Joan Brown
Carmen Finnicum
Krystyna Musik

 

 

 

 

 

This course is designed to build mastery of practical spoken Spanish in its cultural context. The language will be used strategically – to accomplish objectives and resolve conflicts – in situations that relate to everyday life. Linguistic and cultural topics include travel, relationships, food, health, education, sports, entertainment, housing, and jobs. An array of proven language-learning methodologies will be used to build competence. These include role-playing activities, vocabulary expansion, cultural readings, films, oral reports, Internet research, listening activities, pronunciation practice, grammar repair and review, short compositions, and an individual final project. The Honors section features additional mastery activities inside and outside the classroom.

 

 

 

 

Prerequisite: Spanish 107 with a grade of B. Not intended for native speakers.
May not be taken if the student has reached the 400 level in Spanish.

 

 

 

SPAN  300:  Advanced Spanish Composition and Grammar I    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Stacey Hendrix
Asima Saad-Maura

 

 

 

 

 

This course is a comprehensive study of basic and complex grammatical structures with both oral and written practice to facilitate further mastery of vocabulary and structures. Cultural topics are explored through readings that raise awareness of the Hispanic world while building up vocabulary to express abstract ideas.

 

 

Prerequisites: SPAN 200 and SPAN 201

 

 

 

SPAN  301:  Survey of Medieval and Golden Age literature    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Asima Saad-Maura

 

 

 

 

 

This course studies the development of Spanish literature from its origins through the 17th century; it is a study of representative works, discussions and collateral readings.

 

 

From the epic poem of the Cid to the riotous adventures of Don Quijote, from the sorceress Celestina to the seductions of Don Juan, from the picaresque novel Lazarillo de Tormes to the philosophical drama La vida es sueño, this course will explore the literature and culture of Spain from the Middle Ages through the Golden Age. Students will gain exposure to classic authors in various genres of Spanish literature, honing critical skills while exploring the evolution and development of Spain's literary genius.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 201
Fulfills Arts & Sciences ‘Group B’ requirement

 

 

 

SPAN  303:  Survey of Spanish-American Literature    (3 credits)

 

 

 


Gladys Ilarregui

 

 

 

 

 

This course is a survey of Latin American Literature from colonial to the 19th Latin America. It offers an overview of the most salient moments in Latin American literature, cultural history, placing emphasis on the ways in which specific literary works relate to the social and political developments that have shaped the region.

 

 

The course will stress Spanish conversation through debates of the different periods and the knowledge of history and social productions associated with particular texts from the Mayas to the modernist poets. Particular emphasis will be placed in the knowledge of rocks, glyphs and concepts of the pre-Hispanic cultures. You will enter a fascinating world of knowledge through documentary, films and digital resources.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 201
Fulfills Group B Arts & Science requirement

 

 

 

SPAN  305:  Oral Communication    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ángel Esteban

 

 

 

 

 

For individuals with a comprehensive knowledge of Spanish grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis on refinement of expression of abstract ideas as well as mastery of practical communication.

 

 

You love Spanish. You would love to travel to Spanish-speaking countries. You can read Spanish and you can communicate but you want to be able to have meaningful Spanish conversation. This course is designed to help you speak Spanish more fluently and expand your vocabulary while learning current issues and customs in the Hispanic world. The goal is to enable you to sustain conversations and express your opinions on diverse topics. The course draws from a variety of resources, including short stories and essays, articles from the Spanish press, slides, videos, and satellite newscasts. Interactive formats such as class discussions, debates, oral presentations and scenarios will be used.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 200
Restrictions: Not intended for native speakers

 

 

 

SPAN  314:  Spanish Phonetics & Phonology    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Hans-Jörg Busch

 

 

 

 

 

This course is highly recommended for prospective Spanish teachers and students who want to improve and practice their pronunciation and intonation in Spanish. The course will help you to understand how the Spanish phonetic system is organized, compared to the system in English. This, together with a wealth of practical exercises will enable you to lose the typical “American accent”, and to speak like a Spaniard. You will learn how to divide Spanish words into syllables, where and when to put written accents, how to pronounce vowels and consonants, as well as learn about Spanish rhythm, intonation, linguistic variation and phonetic transcription.

 

 

 

SPAN  326:  Latin American Civilization and Cultures    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Phillip Penix-Tadsen

 

 

 

 

 

This course is a survey of the history and culture of Latin America from the time of the region’s indigenous empires to the present. Students will analyze fundamental aspects of the region’s history, geography, politics and cultural production, focusing on issues including human rights, colonialism, nationalism, military intervention, globalization and migration. This course is designed to prepare students for the advanced study of Latin American cultural production by providing them with the historical and social context necessary for studying the cultures of this region. Students will gain an appreciation for the historical roots of present-day social and political issues in Latin America, improve their research and analysis skills, develop their capacity for independent learning and critically examine crucial issues related to Latin American culture.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 200.
Fulfills Arts & Sciences ‘Group B’requirement.

 

 

 

SPAN  401:  Advanced Spanish Grammar II    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Hans-Jörg Busch

 

 

Asima Saad-Maura

 

 

 

 

 

SPAN 401 is not a systematic study of Spanish grammar (that is the purpose of SPAN 200 and 300). In this course students will practice and apply what they have learned in previous courses, as well as broaden their vocabulary through different kinds of writings (i.e.: summaries, opinion papers, narrations, feature articles, descriptions, poems, short stories, etc.), projects and class participation. Furthermore, they will have the opportunity to study and practice more in-depth those structures that traditionally cause the most problems. For example: subjunctive vs. indicative, past tenses, prepositions and pronouns, reflexivity, active vs. passive, text progression, determination, word order, direct vs. indirect speech, sequence of tenses, use of complex tenses, etc.
The SPAN 401 textbook contains an array of authentic readings about the culture, history, and politics of Spain and Latin America. The overall goal of SPAN 401 is to help students reach the ACTFL Language Testing Advanced-Low Level.

 

 

Prerequisite: This course is the last in a series of Spanish language courses.
Students must have taken SPAN 200 and SPAN 300 before enrolling for this course.
The course is conducted in Spanish.

 

 

 

SPAN  436/636:  Teatro del siglo de oro    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jesus Botello

 

 

 

 

 

This course explores canonical literary texts from Golden Age Theater, from the Renaissance to the Baroque. We will learn to read the texts of Hispanic literature within the cultural context of imperial Spain. We will examine the generic characteristics and analyze how the main concerns and themes change according to the evolution of Spanish society. Therefore, we will investigate extra literary aspects, such as the historical, social and political conditions that influenced the creation of the works. In order to gain an overview of the culture and literature of the Golden Age, especial attention will be paid to other art forms, such as painting, sculpture and architecture.

 

 

Prerequisite: One 300-level survey of literature course.

 

 

 

SPAN  450:  Modern Hispanic Literature 1898-1936    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ángel Esteban

 

 

 

 

 

The blending of European, Spanish and Latin American genius produces a twentieth century literary movement, Modernismo, in which the cult of beauty, love, fantasy, and desire produce the rhythms and harmonies of verbal music.

 

 

Prerequisites: One SPAN 300-level survey of literature course

 

 

 

SPAN  455:  Human Rights and Latin American Literature    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Gladys Ilarregui

 

 

 

 

 

In this class we will study the historical legacy of Human Rights issues in Latin American literary and cultural discourses from the colonial to contemporary periods. This class will examine culture as a space of contestation of authoritarian regimes, official discourses and official justifications for state actions. We will concentrate in the cultural production as a post authoritarian forum for the understanding of victims, minorities and excluded groups.

 

 

Poetry is at the center of these discourses and the works of Zurita, Gelman, Neruda and others will be analyzed at the light of these complex realities. Digital resources, film, documentaries, and poetic and journalistic works will be at the center of our discussions.

 

 

Prerequisites: One SPAN 300-level survey of literature course

 

 

 

SPAN  460-080:  The Nations of Spain: From Andalucía to el País Vasco    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Joan Brown

 

 

 

 

 

This seminar explores contemporary literature of Spain across regions. From sun-baked Andalusian towns to the vibrant city of Barcelona to mist-shrouded Galician estates to timeless villages in the Basque countryside, we will experience Spanish life in many different settings. These are regions that lay claim to independent status as nations. All readings will be in Castilian (what we usually call “Spanish”); some are expert translations from Catalan, Galician and Basque. Titles span a range of genres: drama, short story and the novel. The overarching goal of this course is to take a literary journey through Spain, reading a few select works with care and focusing on individual responses. Through intensive practice, each student will build his or her critical skills and language abilities.

 

 

Course meets with an MA-level graduate section

 

 

 

SPAN  475:  LGBTQ in Latin America    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Persephone Braham

 

 

 

 

 

This course will explore the experience of gender and sexual minorities in Latin America, from a transvestite nun who fought in the Spanish conquest of Perú, to the suppression of homosexuals under the Cuban Revolution, to transgender artists in the Caribbean club scene. According to recent press accounts, Latin America is the most progressive region in the world on LGBT rights. Yet centuries of social and religious tradition would seem to contradict this, and sexual and gender minorities face prejudice, violence, and silencing in a variety of contexts. Through historical sources, popular media, literature, and film, this course will inform students on the perspectives, struggles, and journeys of LGBTQ lives in Latin America.

 

 

Taught in Spanish.

 

 

Prerequisites: Any of the following: SPAN307, SPAN308, SPAN325, SPAN326.

 

 

 

SPAN  475/675:  Songwriting and political engagement in Latin America and Spain    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Alexander Selimov

 

 

 

 

 

What is the contribution of music to the process of shaping political and social identities in Spain, Latin America and the Caribbean during the second half of the 20th century? How instrumental is the work of politically engaged songwriters for the process of nation-state building in the Hispanic World? These and other related questions will be answered throughout this course, as we will explore the special role music has played in twentieth century politics and culture. This course has two take home exams and a final exam. The classwork consists of 50% lectures and 50% discussion. All classroom discussions follow the ACTFL (American Council for Teaching of Foreign Languages) recommendations for improving students' oral communication skills.

 

 

Prerequisites: Any of the following: SPAN307, SPAN308, SPAN325, SPAN326

 

 

 

SPAN  490-010/80:  Historical Fictions    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cristina Guardiola

 

 

 

 

 

“The one duty we owe to history is to rewrite it.” (Oscar Wilde) In this course we will read prize winning works of historical fiction. These works, most of which were written in the past 15 years, are set in Spain’s past. The course will explore the varying trends and representations of the past in modern genres, commercial venues, and through ideological frameworks. We will examine the process and purpose of recreating these fictions in modern and contemporary literature and film. Specifically, we will examine how modern remembrances of the past were used and abused by modern authors, politicians, and imagined communities. We will focus on the varied communities who have incorporated history into their modern artistic endeavors, either in an attempt to garner political or financial gain, to create or recreate ideas of the past that fits better into more modern mindsets, and to show change between the ethos of the past with that of the present.

 

 

Prerequisites: One of SPAN 301, 302, 303, 304, 355 or 370 and one SPAN 400-level course.

 

 

About this section: This capstone course is designed for Spanish majors in their senior year of study. Honors students who are not in their senior year, or other interested advanced level students may petition the instructor for admittance.

 

 

 

SPAN  660-10:  The Nations of Spain: From Andalucía to el País Vasco    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Joan Brown

 

 

 

 

 

This seminar explores contemporary literature of Spain across regions. From sun-baked Andalusian towns to the vibrant city of Barcelona to mist-shrouded Galician estates to timeless villages in the Basque countryside, we will experience Spanish life in many different settings. These are regions that lay claim to independent status as nations. All readings will be in Castilian (what we usually call “Spanish”); some are expert translations from Catalan, Galician and Basque. Titles span a range of genres: drama, short story and the novel. The overarching goal of this course is to take a literary journey through Spain, reading a select works with care, while preparing for the Contemporary Peninsular portion of the MA Comprehensive Exams.

 

 

The course meets with an Honors undergraduate seminar, and graduate students will be engaged in the pedagogy of teaching literature.

 

 

 

SPAN  875:  Spanish Poetry and Theater of the 18th and 19th centuries    ( credits)

 

 

 

Alexander Selimov

 

 

 

 

 

In this seminar, all relevant works from the MA reading list (18th and 19th centuries) will be studied, contextualized, and discussed in depth. The course begins with a presentation of the theoretical framework of psychological / cognitive approaches to literature and culture. The grade is based on two exams, classroom presentations and one final essay.

 

 

 

SPAN  875-011:  Passion, Power, and Politics in Contemporary Spanish American Literature.    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cynthia Schmidt-Cruz

 

 

 

 

 

This course will explore the connections between power, politics, and passion in Spanish American texts from the 20th and 21st centuries. We will study texts portraying power exerted by states and by certain social groups, as well as gender roles and the balance or imbalance of power in relations between the sexes and love relationships. For instance, a Central American country becomes gripped in a labyrinth of terror by a ruthless and sensual dictator. An all-powerful director of a major newspaper becomes obsessed with a staff writer—his growing delirium in regard to the woman is only paralleled in intensity by the government corruption that his newspaper is attempting to expose. A young wife struggles against the oppression of her husband, a powerful general. Divorced women confront machismo head-on as they seek more illuminated and sensitive partners. In these gripping tales, political power and erotic passion intertwine to convey the age-old story of ambition and desire run rampant as well as a newer tale of resistance to structures of oppression.

 

 

This graduate seminar involves close textual analysis and the study of critical and theoretical texts, culminating in an original research paper. Literary works include: Doña Bárbara Rómulo Gallegos, El señor Presidente by Miguel Ángel Asturias, El vuelo de la reina by Tomás Eloy Martínez, Arráncame la vida by Ángeles Mastretta, Entre Pancho Villa y una mujer desnuda by Sabina Berman, and Betibú by Claudia Piñeiro. We will also view film versions of several of the texts.