Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

University of Delaware

 

Student Friendly Course Descriptions

 

Level 200 and Above – Fall 2013 Courses

 

 

 

 

 

Arabic

 

 

Chinese

 

Classics

 

FLLT/CMLT

 

 

 

 

German

 

 

Hebrew

 

Italian

 

Japanese

 

 

Portuguese

 

 

 French

 

Russian

 

Spanish

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arabic

 

 

 

ARAB  200:  Advanced Intermediate Arabic    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ikram Masmoudi

 

 

 

 

 

In addition to the main text book, emphasis is on reading and viewing authentic materials from Arab media to improve reading, writing, and listening skills, and to increase knowledge of Arab culture.

 

 

 

ARAB  205:  Arabic Conversation    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ikram Masmoudi

 

 

 

 

 

Focuses on improving oral communication skills through discussion of various topics related to modern social and cultural life in the Arab world. Includes grammar review and writing practice.

 

 

Prerequisite: ARAB 200

 

 

 

Chinese

 

 

 

CHIN  200:  Intermediate Chinese II    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Haihong Yang

 

 

 

 

 

This course aims at a further development of all four language skills which the students have acquired from the 100-level CHIN courses. In particular, the course emphasizes a further study of advanced Chinese grammar and basic essay writing. In this course students will not only learn authentic Chinese in terms of idiomatic usages, familiar sayings, and sophisticated grammar structure, but get to know Chinese society and culture as well. By the end of this course, students should have commanded around 250 new words and/or phrases in order to engage in a linguistically and culturally sophisticated communication in Chinese.

 

 

Honor students will read one more essay and give an oral presentation on that essay. Prerequisite: CHIN107.

 

 

 

CHIN  267:  Art of Chinese Calligraphy    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Maria Tu

 

 

 

 

 

This course introduces students to the rich art of Chinese calligraphy that has a long history of over two thousand years. In this course students will learn about the evolution of Chinese characters, the aesthetics of Chinese calligraphy, various kinds of intriguing ink and brush writing styles represented by noted calligraphers, the relation between Chinese calligraphy, philosophy, as well as other forms of art such as seal carving and painting. More importantly and entertainingly engaging, students will first learn how to use brush pen to practice Chinese calligraphy, which involves a working knowledge of styles such as seal script, clerical scripts, cursive script, semi-cursive script, regular script, and writing tools such as rice paper, ink, brush, ink stone, paperweight, desk pad, and seal. Then students will learn some basics of Chinese painting and be able to paining simple objects such as insects, fish, and flowers.

 

 

 

CHIN  350:  Business Chinese    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Renee Dong

 

 

 

 

 

This advanced intermediate Chinese language course aims at preparing students for effective communication in casual and formal business settings. While systemically providing trainings in all four aspects of language study (listening, speaking, reading and writing), this course has a strong emphasis on fluency in listening and speaking and focuses on the practical and functional use of the language. The students will practice language use and functions in common business situations, conduct company case analysis and perform communicative tasks on news reports and other business related multimedia materials. These activities are designed to be communicative, task-orientated, and learner-centered. Since culture and context are critical for successful foreign language learning, this course also incorporates discussion of Chinese business culture and etiquette to promote socially appropriate language use.

 

 

 

CHIN  467:  Advanced Readings in Chinese (Mandarin)    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jianguo Chen

 

 

 

 

 

This course focuses on developing students’ advanced reading skills. By studying a set of carefully selected texts, particularly literary texts, in modern Chinese, the course introduces students to the literary aspect of the Chinese language. Students will not only improve their advanced reading skills but will learn how to appreciate, in the broadest sense, modern and contemporary Chinese literature at its finest. Selected films will be shown to complement course readings. The course is taught entirely in Mandarin Chinese.

 

 

Notes: The course is taught entirely in Mandarin Chinese. The course counts towards the Chinese Minor. Honors option available (section 080).

 

 

 

Classics

 

 

 

LATN  201:  Intermediate Latin: Prose    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Staff

 

 

 

 

 

This first-reading course in ancient Roman language and culture trains students in translating authentic prose writings by major Roman figures such as Cicero, distinguished philosopher and orator; Caesar, master politician and general; and Livy, celebrated historian and ur-sociologist. An historical novel in English that illuminates the era and brings it to life will be read and discussed. Also students will prepare a short research essay on Roman culture chosen from a broad list of topics ranging from mythology to the cinema of Fellini. Two examinations consisting of translation and parsing and a final examination of the same type will complete the course.

 

 

 

GREK  201/301:  : Advanced Intermediate Greek: Ancient Prose    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Annette Giesecke

 

 

 

 

 

This course is devoted to the reading and analysis of Plato's dialogue the Apology of Socrates, which recounts the devastating charges brought against Socrates and the events leading to his execution. Course content includes looking at Athenian culture and society at the time when the dialogue was written as well as reading a contemporary novel, The Plot to Save Socrates, which sheds further light on Socrates' life.

 

 

As this is a first reading course, there will also be extensive grammar review.

 

 

 

LATN  301/401:  Advanced Intermediate Latin Prose    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Staff

 

 

 

 

 

This class deals with translating the prose of a single ancient Roman writer and thinker. The topic for this year will be selections from the orations of Cicero, whose “influence,” according to classisist Michael Grant "upon the history of European literature and ideas greatly exceeds that of any other prose writer in any language." In addition students will read and comment upon a novel written in English that deals probingly with the rich political climate of the turbulent Ciceronian period when Rome was undergoing a wrenching transformation from republic to empire. Students will also prepare a brief research essay on a subject of Roman culture of interest to them, drawn from a list. Two examinations consisting of translation and parsing and a final examination of the same type will complete the course.

 

 

 

FLLT

 

 

 

FLLT  330:  Society and Spectacle in Ancient Greece and Rome    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Annette Giesecke

 

 

 

 

 

General Aims: This course will trace the notion of the spectacle in various aspects of life in classical antiquity, religious and secular alike. From bull leaping contests in Bronze Age Crete, we will shift to mainland Greece, to the Parthenon and other wondrous structures on the Athenian acropolis, and to the sanctuaries at Delphi, Eleusis, and Olympia. Taking into account not only physical, archaeological remains but also literary sources, we will examine the spectacle of cult activity at these sanctuaries. From Greece, the course will shift to Roman Italy. We will decode the Roman villa, Etruscan graveyards, the architectural and artistic propaganda of the Caesars, and gladiatorial contests. Characterizing the course: The idea of this course is to give students the impression of travel (albeit back in time), of experiencing life as the Greeks and Romans did in so far as we are able. It will be our aim as a class to discover the ways in which the Greeks and Roman sought out entertainment, spiritual fulfillment and venues for personal aggrandizement via spectacles of various sorts, architectural, theatrical, mystic, and athletic included. As the spectacular can be found in such a diversity forms, a roughly chronological approach will be taken in order to provide a sense of cohesiveness to the material covered.

 

 

 

FLLT  330-011:  (Homo)Sexualities in History: Europe Pre-1800    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Gary Ferguson

 

 

 

 

 

This course will examine the construction of gender and sexuality in pre-modern Europe, paying particular attention to the various manifestations of the homosexual and the homoerotic. Materials will come primarily from Ancient Greece and Rome and from 16th- and 17th-century France, England, and Italy. Taking as our starting point Michel Foucault’s famous contention that the homosexual as a “species” came into being only in 19th-century medical discourse, we will read texts and documents from the earlier periods, in order to explore their representation of gender, sexual roles, and various forms of same-sex relationships. We will thus engage a discussion of pre-modern understandings and practices of sex, love, and desire, and of the ways in which these differ from or are similar to those of today.

 

 

Course counts for College of Arts and Science Group B requirement (“Study of Culture and Institutions over Time”) and University “History and Cultural Change” requirement; also an elective for the minor in Sexualities and Gender Studies (SGST).

 

 

 

FLLT  333:  Israeli Film    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Eynat Gutman

 

 

 

 

 

This course studies fascinating topics in Israeli Film, such as the Construction and Deconstruction of the Israeli Sabra and Ethnic Groups in Israel. Israeli Film encompasses decades of change and development in Israeli society, as well as the different groups this society consists of.

 

 

Prerequisites: none. The course satisfies a Group B as well as a Multicultural requirement. Taught in English, this course is discussion-intensive. The course may NOT be taken by students who completed HEBR 209.

 

 

 

FLLT  375:  Topics in Russian and Soviet Culture: Tempting Fate    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Julia Hulings

 

 

 

 

 

Bet you didn’t know that “Russian” roulette isn’t even Russian. Despite this fact, the idea of tempting fate is, indeed, quite Russian. Scholar Nina Wieda identifies in Russian society a cultural propensity that deems it “more attractive and ethical to spend, waste, and lose, rather than save, keep, and retain.” Couple this live-for-today attitude with macho pride and the historical system of social rank, and you get the pervasive gambling and dueling that permeates 19th and early 20th century Russian literature. Pushkin’s Queen of Spades and Dostoevsky’s The Gambler faithfully reflect the obsessions and dangers of such risk, with the latter ironically written in a hurry to cover the author’s own gambling debt. We find a pompous recklessness, but with pistols, in Lermontov’s Hero of Our Time, Chekhov’s The Duel and in Kuprin’s novel of the same name. The idea of pushing one’s luck also takes the form of deals with the devil that can be traced from to folklore to more modern times, notably in Kuprin’s Star of Solomon, and Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita. We even see the idea of playing God through genetic manipulation in Bulgakov’s Fatal Eggs, an example of Soviet science fiction. Come read the masters and explore the “rolling of the dice” in Russian and Soviet culture! [Honors students will read one extra related work of their choice and will write an additional longer paper (6-7 pp.) on a topic approved by the professor.]

 

 

Satisfies Group B “History and Cultural Change”; Prerequisites: None

 

 

 

FLLT  380:  Critical Approaches to the Japanese Videogame    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Rachael Hutchinson

 

 

 

 

 

This course aims to acquaint students with the major genres of videogames produced by Japanese development companies, as well as the major critical approaches taken by academics to the study of those games. Issues for discussion include the dominance of console platforms in Japan as opposed to online or PC gaming; different approaches to the roleplaying game taken by Nintendo and Square Enix; and problematic representations of gender and race in specific game texts. We will examine theoretical terms like ‘immersion’ and ‘identification’ and see how these apply to different styles of play, specifically the roleplaying game (RPG), binary combat or fighting game (BCG), and first-person shooter (FPS). We will examine the role of graphics and dimensionality in immersion, especially the effect of increasingly realistic environments. The importance of the cutscene will be examined in contrast to the opening cinematic sequences of attract mode, as well as graphic representation in the normal field of play. Performance will be examined in terms of arcade games and the arcade roots of many contemporary games, with particular reference to Guitar Hero and Rock Band on the Nintendo Wii and the creation of doubled space.

 

 

During this course, students will be expected to log a certain number of hours playing game texts from different genres in the Games Lab in Morris Library. We will be using games developed for the PlayStation 2 and 3, including games from the following series: Final Fantasy, Virtua Fighter, Tekken, Metal Gear Solid, Soul Calibur, and Katamari Damacy. Case studies of particular game developers will include the visionaries Hideo Kojima and Tetsuya Nomura.

 

 

Honors students will have the opportunity to complete a research essay on a topic related to the course content.

 

 

 

FLLT  422-010:  Language Syllabus and Materials Development    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ali Alalou
Cynthia Lees

 

 

 

 

 

Wondering how to select a textbook, or how to put together the syllabus for your next language course? Interested in creating your own teaching materials? This course will give you the opportunity to learn about the latest approaches to syllabus and materials design, while giving you extensive hands-on experience in the creation of your own classroom tasks and homework assignments.

 

 

The Practicum's content includes the preparation and teaching of lesson plans; the formulation of a classroom management strategy and classroom rules; the discussion of assigned readings in the text; the presentation of effective approaches to teaching vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation, and reading and writing in the content area; and an introduction to the uses of authentic cultural materials in the foreign language classroom. The completion of a 25-hour placement at the student teaching site includes observations and the teaching of mini-lessons in those venues. The goal of the Practicum is to provide strategies and techniques for effective teaching in the target language and to promote a variety of hands-on experiences that will ensure a successful student teaching experience in Spring 2014.

 

 

 

FLLT  424/624:  Second Language Testing    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jorge Cubillos

 

 

 

 

 

This course is designed to provide future language teachers with the knowledge and skills required to develop a variety of classroom assessment methods. Participants will learn how to implement multiple formal and informal techniques to evaluate their students' progress, and how to use test results to improve instruction. Special emphasis will be given to the design of comprehensive assessment plans for specific thematic units.

 

 

NOTE: Familiarity with basic Second Language Acquisition Concepts is expected. Completion of a Foreign Language or ESL Teaching Methods course such as FLLT 421/621 or FLLT 623 is highly recommended.

 

 

 

FLLT  467:  Chinese Culture: Communities and Identities    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Haihong Yang

 

 

 

 

 

This course introduces the development and significance of social and cultural practices and imaginations that produce and shape Chinese communities and identities. Our approach is broadly interdisciplinary, roughly chronological, and ultimately self-reflective. It is interdisciplinary in that we engage with philosophy, politics, poetry, autobiography, language, posters, film, and more. It is chronological in its transition from pre-modern to modern China, from the works of Confucius up through Mao-era propaganda posters and contemporary oral histories. It is self-reflective in that from beginning to end you are asked to think about your own cultural assumptions, as well as your connection to China—a task of crucial importance given China’s unprecedented and growing influence on global economics, environment, and politics.

 

 

Honors students will read one more essay and give an oral presentation on that essay.

 

 

 

FLLT  495:  Literary Perspectives on Cultural Diversity: Humanity Under Seige    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cynthia Lees

 

 

 

 

 

In this Capstone Seminar, you will read and discuss translated contemporary prose fiction from around the globe. These texts depict humanity’s darkest days: a suicide bombing in Jerusalem; the detention and torture of the rape of women in Bosnian death camps; the exploitation of child soldiers in Liberia; the gassing of victims at a Belgrade concentration camp; the savage sequestration of Japanese delinquent youth in World War II Japan; the murder of citizens during the “dirty war” in Argentina; and the violent impact of colonialism in a borderland where Arabia melds with black Africa. These may be horror stories in the truest sense. Discussion of ethical, social, and political issues that transcend linguistic, ethnic, and geographical lines of demarcation will encourage you to identify problematic and significant questions raised by the works themselves, crossing the boundaries of culture, language, and time.

 

 

All texts will be in English. This course fulfills the multicultural requirement and the 2nd writing requirement. It is restricted to and required of foreign language majors (including three-language majors). Please consult with your advisor in choosing a Capstone.

 

 

 

FLLT  623-10:  Theoretical and Practical Issues in Foreign Language Pedagogy    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ali Alalou

 

 

 

 

 

Graduate assistants enrolled in this course will study current perspectives on foreign language instruction and have extensive hands-on experience with the implementation of effective language teaching strategies. Emphasis will be given to the enhancement of students' proficiency in class planning, syllabus design and materials preparation.

 

 

Restrictions: Graduate students only

 

 

 

FLLT  626:  Seminar on Second Language Acquisition Research    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jorge H. Cubillos

 

 

 

 

 

This course is an in-depth exploration of topics pertaining to the acquisition of a second or additional language. Class readings and assignments will provide students with an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods in applied linguistics. Emphasis is given to the development of independent study, problem-solving, research, reading, writing and oral presentation skills. _Note_: This course is highly recommended for students planning to write a Master's thesis, and for those preparing for their comprehensive examination in Foreign Language Pedagogy.

 

 

This course is highly recommended for students planning to write a Master's thesis, and for those preparing for their comprehensive examination in Foreign Language Pedagogy.

 

 

 

French

 

 

 

FREN  200-010/080:  French Grammar and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Karen Quandt

 

 

 

 

 

This course provides a comprehensive grammar review contextualized in literary excerpts. Students complete grammar exercises, respond to comprehension questions on the readings, and write short essays in order to improve their language skills.

 

 

Prerequisite: FREN 107.
This course may be taken for honors credit.
It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course
have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.

 

 

 

FREN  205-010/080:  French Conversation    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Flora Poindexter

 

 

 

 

 

This course is centered upon the practical use of French to develop proficiency primarily in speaking but also in writing by way of oral presentations, small group and round table discussions, and written tasks. If you enjoy learning about French and Francophone music, art, cultural practices, fashion, foods, current events and a host of other topics, French Conversation will provide you with rich, interactive opportunities to do so.

 

 

The Honors section of French Conversation focuses on a short contemporary novel and its film version. The group will meet on a regular basis to discuss the novel which provides students with useful “modern” vocabulary. Students will also have an extra oral presentation based on an interview with a Francophone person.

 

 

Prerequisite: FREN 107 or any 200-level French course taught in the French language.
Restrictions: A minimum grade of B is required for the prerequisites.
Not intended for native speakers of French.
May be taken for Honors credit.
It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.

 

 

 

FREN  211-010/080:  French Reading and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Karen Quandt
Edgard Sankara

 

 

 

 

 

This course emphasizes critical reading skills and compositions that target formal literary analysis. Close readings of texts (which consider character development, historical and social context, rhetorical devices, style, etc.) encourage the student to move beyond the level of plot summary to analyze the works under study. Focusing on 19th-century French short stories, students will be introduced to the major literary and artistic movements of the period. Grammar review is also incorporated.

 

 

Satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences Group A breadth requirement.

Prerequisites: FREN 200 with a minimum grade of C or FREN 107 with a minimum grade of A-.
FREN 211 is required as a prerequisite for FREN 301 or 302.

Honors section meets with the regular section.
It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course have earned grades of A or A- in previous coursework.

 

 

 

FREN  301-010/080:  Introduction to French Literature: Prose    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cynthia Lees

 

 

 

 

 

FREN 301, Introduction to French Literature: Prose, functions as a GPS that navigates the prose fiction of major French authors from the Middle Ages to the present who grapple with passion and perversion. The mood is decidedly dark, gothic perhaps. Topics include identity, social transformation, gender, class, incest, borders, and disorders. At the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of French culture and society, to analyze critically, and to discuss representative works of French literature.

 

 

Prerequisites: FREN 211 and any other 200-level course taught in French, both with a suggested minimum grade of B-.
This course may be taken for honors credit.
It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.

Satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences Group B breadth requirement.

 

 

 

FREN  302-010/080:  Introduction to French Literature: Poetry and Theatre    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Edgard Sankara

 

 

 

 

 

A gladiator, returning victorious from battle, slays his sister for her lack of patriotism; a young prince succumbs to the wrath of Neptune rather than betray the confidences of his evil stepmother. Enter the world of monsters, madmen, and maidens in distress! Introduction to French Poetry and Theater explores poets and dramatists from the Renaissance through the twentieth century with particular attention to the methods and language of literary analysis through close readings and explications de texte. In this course you will learn the terminology of literary criticism, employ this terminology in critical analyses of poems and plays, and discuss the recurring themes – power, love, deception, loss, patriarchy, totalitarianism – in the works studied.

 

 

Prerequisites: FREN 211 and any 200-level course taught in the French language, both with a suggested minimum grade of B-.

This course may be taken for Honors credit; it is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit in this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.

Satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences Group B breadth requirement.

 

 

 

FREN  305-010/080:  French Conversation and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Deborah Steinberger

 

 

 

 

 

French 305 is an advanced conversation and composition course, conducted entirely in French, which focuses primarily on current issues in France and the Francophone world. Topics covered include politics, social issues, science and technology, and the arts. You will practice French through oral reports, role play, and discussions, as well as through regular written assignments including movie reviews and your own blog. Grammar review will be tailored to the needs of the class.

 

 

Prerequisites: FREN 211 and one other 200-level course taught in French, both with a suggested minimum grade of B-.
This course may be taken for Honors credit; it is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit in this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.

Not intended for native speakers of French.

 

 

 

FREN  451/651:  20th Century French Literature – Age of Anxiety and Absurd    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Bruno Thibault

 

 

 

 

 

Do you think one can envision a world without a divine plan? Without divine transcendence are men and women condemned to immorality and violence? Can violence and war lead to freedom and justice? When is rebellion justified? Is authentic art the expression of subconscious drives? In this class, we will discuss these themes and other related issues through close readings of masterpieces of French literature published during the interwar era, 1914-1944 (novels, essays and plays by Gide, Yourcenar, Sartre, Beauvoir and Camus). Special attention will be devoted to Surrealism (Breton, Éluard, Aragon, Char, Michaux) and Existentialism.

 

 

Prerequisites: any two 300-level literature courses taught in French.

 

 

 

FREN  453:  Contemporary French Civilization    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Bruno Thibault

 

 

 

 

 

Culture, customs and political and economic life in France since 1953.

 

 

Are you interested in knowing more about today's real people in France? About the movies they like, the comics they read, the records they listen to, the games they enjoy? About their vision of France and the European Union? About the role and status of French women in the workforce and at home? About immigration and minorities in France? Are you also interested in learning more about the constitution of the 5th Republic and its institutions; De Gaulle and the May 1968 student uprising; Mitterand, the Régionalisation reform and the Cohabitation in the 1990's, as well as Chirac's and Sarkozy's domestic and international policies? Then take FREN453. This course, taught in French, focuses on contemporary French culture from 1958 to the present.

 

 

Prerequisite: Any two 300-level courses taught in French.

 

 

 

FREN  459/659:  Négritude, Antillanité, Créolité    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Edgard Sankara

 

 

 

 

 

What is the Caribbean? Does its history begin with Christopher Columbus? Should one consider the Native American component as a significant element in the construction of this region or should the Caribbean simply be called a New World which developed with slavery and the plantation system?

 

 

Are the Caribbean people Native American, Indian, European, African, Asian or are they a fascinating métissage (mix) of all these ethnicities? What are the historical, cultural and political situations of Francophone Caribbean people (Haiti and the “French Overseas Departments”) within the global Caribbean region? Why are the literary movements of Négritude, Antillanité, Créolité such an important contribution to a better understanding of the Caribbean and to the enrichment of the now flourishing subject of Postcolonial Studies?

 

 

Come and whet your intellectual curiosity about the Caribbean through the study of novels, plays, poems, critical essays and films on Aimé Césaire, Raphaël Confiant, Maryse Condé, Léopold Senghor, and more.

 

 

Prerequisites: Two 300-level literature courses taught in French.

 

 

 

FREN  875:  Did Women Have a Renaissance?    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Gary Ferguson

 

 

 

 

 

Asking this question for the first time in the late 1970s, Joan Kelly Gadol answered in the negative. The vast body of work by historians and literary scholars since, however, has revealed a more complex picture and calls for a reconsideration. In France, then, what was the Renaissance? And in what ways and to what extent were women involved? In particular, how were they written about and how did they write? Discussion will begin with the Heptaméron of Marguerite de Navarre, sometimes referred to as “Mother of the Renaissance,” read in relation to its Boccaccian model, various medieval literary traditions - from the courtly romance to the fabliau - the long-standing querelle des femmes, as well as recent debates on marriage and courtliness. Published somewhat earlier, the Comptes amoureux de Jeanne Flore raise the issue of collaborative mixed-sex authorship, female authorial personae, strategies for marketing books, and the importance of different social and geographical locations (city vs. court; Paris vs. Lyon and other provincial cities). Similar questions will be pursued in relation to the amorous verse of Louise Labé and Pierre de Ronsard, and the works of the Dames des Roches (the mother-daughter bond; the salon) and Anne de Marquets (the convent). The seminar will conclude with selected essays by Montaigne, reflecting on different forms of opposite and same-sex relationship, texts inseparable from (those of) his friend, Étienne de La Boétie, and his “fille d’alliance” and posthumous editor, novelist and essayist, Marie de Gournay.

 

 

Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to graduate students.

 

 

 

German

 

 

 

GRMN  205:  German Conversation    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ester Riehl

 

 

 

 

 

If you visited a German-speaking country, what would you want to tell your hosts about your country, your hometown, and your daily life and interests? What are people talking about in contemporary Germany, Austria, and Switzerland? And if you were visiting there, how would you ask questions to find out more about the things that your hosts find important? To prepare you for these situations, we will use online and print media to learn and practice grammar and vocabulary relevant to current social, political and cultural events. Students will write vocabulary lists, short paragraphs and dialogs to prepare for classroom conversation, and complete midterm and final oral exams.

 

 

Prerequisite: successful completion of GRMN 107 or the equivalent Not intended for students who have already completed German courses at the 300-level or above

 

 

 

GRMN  256:  Reading for Cultural Awareness    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Lisa Thibault

 

 

 

 

 

Have you taken German 107 (or the equivalent) and would like to continue to learn more German? Then this course is for you. We will review some of the basic material you learned in the 100-levels (or in high school) and build upon those skills to explore the German-speaking people’s unique way of life. You’ll read and discuss a variety of materials and encounter a broad range of topics. Some of the readings will be supplemented by short films or videos. You’ll learn about German culture, improve your reading skills, expand your vocabulary, and have the opportunity to work on some elementary and intermediate grammar elements. You’ll discuss readings, write short compositions and participate in partner and group activities. There will be quizzes, a mid-term and a final exam.

 

 

Prerequisite: successful completion of GRMN 107 or the equivalent Not intended for students who have already completed German courses at the 300 level or above.

 

 

 

GRMN  355-010:  Germany and the EU    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Nancy Nobile

 

 

 

 

 

As its largest member state, Germany plays a crucial role in the stability and development of the European Union. With our main focus on Germany, we will discuss the history of the EU, the challenges it currently faces, and its goals for the future. Readings will be drawn from German newspapers, broadcasts, and online sources. Our discussions will also center around student projects, created in small increments over the course of the semester. This course will expand students’ knowledge of the EU, and hone their speaking, reading, listening, and writing skills. In addition to the project, there will be a midterm and a final exam

 

 

Prerequisite: any two 200-level courses taught in German.

 

 

 

GRMN  355-011:  The 20th Century in Film    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ester Riehl

 

 

 

 

 

Film emerged as an exciting and frightening new communications medium of the 20th century. Whether intended to spread political propaganda, provide an entertaining escape from daily life, or to experiment with new ways of expressing art forms and ideas, film came to be a powerful tool that both shaped and reflected German experiences throughout the 20th century. Examining some of these films will bring us closer to an understanding of the social, political and historical contexts from which they emerged. The goals of the course are to introduce students to some of the major cultural and political issues of the 20th century in Germany, learn to recognize and interpret cinematic techniques, and improve students’ German language skills. Students will write several short papers, two essays, and a midterm and final exam.

 

 

Prerequisite: any two 200-level courses taught in German.

 

 

 

GRMN  455:  The Craft of Translating    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Nancy Nobile

 

 

 

 

 

This course will offer students an unusual approach to German literary texts by focusing on their translation. We will work with short masterpieces of German literature, explore how they have been variously translated by others, and create translations of our own. The verb “translate” comes from Latin roots meaning “to carry across” or “to bring over.” What gets lost when one attempts to carry beautiful meanings across from one language to another? Can one compensate for these losses somehow? Since all translations are, in a sense, interpretations, students will learn a lot about interpreting literature. Through hands-on experience rather than memorization, students will also hone their grammar skills, expand their vocabularies, and increase their sensitivity to the written word. Some of the authors whose texts we’ll work with include Rilke, Kafka, Hesse, Lasker-Schüler, and Benn. Students will complete several short and one longer project.

 

 

Prerequisite: for majors: any three 300-level courses for minors: any two 300-level courses This course may be taken concurrently with a 300-level course.

 

 

 

GRMN  467:  Advanced Grammar & Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Iris Busch

 

 

 

 

 

Do you want to perfect the way you use German and feel more comfortable on the advanced level of proficiency? Practice! Practice! Practice! This course will give students the opportunity to develop an accurate, active, and imaginative use of the German language by providing ample chance to practice advanced grammar structures in meaningful, communicative contexts in both oral and written form.

 

 

Prerequisite: for majors: any three 300-level courses for minors: any two 300-level courses This course may be taken concurrently with a 300-level course.

 

 

 

Italian

 

 

 

ITAL  200:  Italian Grammar Review    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Laura Salsini

 

 

 

 

 

You want to learn a second language, but you're afraid of being bored. Then take this opportunity to change your opinion! You will be engaged in learning Italian and its grammar through short stories, films, music, debates and many other activities. This course is a great way to review the fundamentals of the language and fine tune your communication skills.

 

 

Prerequisite: ITAL 107
Honors credit available

 

 

 

ITAL  205:  Italian Conversation    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Giorgio Melloni

 

 

 

 

 

You're so close to proficiency in Italian! Consolidate your hard-earned language skills through conversation and oral presentations, with grammar review and written work when appropriate. Students will discuss current events along with material from films, the Internet and other sources. Have fun while improving your speaking skills!

 

 

Prerequisite: ITAL 107
Honors Credit Available

 

 

 

ITAL  211:  Italian Reading & Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Laura Salsini

 

 

 

 

 

Let the masters of the Italian short story teach you how to write! This courses emphasizes vocabulary acquisition and written expression. Students will read and discuss short works of literature and film. You will improve your writing skills, add to your rich stock of conversation topics in Italian, and begin your love affair with contemporary Italian authors.

 

 

Prerequisite: ITAL 200, ITAL 205, or ITAL 206
Honors Credit Available Counts as Group A

 

 

 

ITAL  310:  Survey of Italian Literature    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Riccarda Saggese

 

 

 

 

 

You enjoy the language, you are interested in Italian culture, and Italy fascinates you. You are now ready to explore Italy's literary past and acquaint yourself with some of the country's great masters and masterpieces. Through the study of selected works and authors, you will also gain a better understanding of Italy's history and culture. This course will be taught through a combination of informal lectures and discussion.

 

 

Prerequisite: ITAL 211 or ITAL 212 Honors Credit Available Counts as Group B

 

 

 

ITAL  355:  History of Italian Cinema    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Giorgio Melloni

 

 

 

 

 

The aim of this course is to acquire an understanding of Italian cinema from its origins to the present, with an emphasis on major directors and films representative of their work. In this course a range of films and film clips will guide us through an examination of the impact and the importance that Italian cinema has had on the history of world cinema and culture. The history of Italian film is one that fluctuates between two separate poles: artistic innovation and commercial instinct. During the semester we will look at films from the Golden Age of the silent era to Neorealism, from comedy Italian style to the spaghetti western and beyond.

 

 

Prerequisites: Ital310 or Ital311 Available for Honors credit

 

 

 

ITAL  455:  20th Century Italian Literature    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Laura Salsini

 

 

 

 

 

This course will examine the great authors of the 20th century, and look at how they address some of the critical issues of the era. Topics such as World War II and Fascism, feminism and gender roles, the consumer society and social and political unrest will be discussed. This course will also offer opportunities for improving communication skills, especially writing and speaking.

 

 

Prerequisites: Any two 300-level courses Available for Honors credit

 

 

 

Japanese

 

 

 

JAPN  201:  Advanced Intermediate Japanese I    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Mutsuko Sato

 

 

 

 

 

This course covers the first six chapters of Genki II text book. Students learn to use various grammatical forms to convey different nuances. Classes are conducted mostly in Japanese. Activities include oral, reading and writing exercises on various topics. About 90 additional Kanji will be introduced.

 

 

Honors Section Available.
Prerequisite: JAPN107
Textbook: Genki II

 

 

 

JAPN  202:  Advanced Intermediate Japanese II    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Chika Inoue

 

 

 

 

 

This course covers the last five chapters of Genki II text book. Students learn to use various grammatical forms to convey different nuances. Classes are conducted in Japanese. Activities include oral presentations and essays on various topics. About 75 additional Kanji will be introduced.

 

 

Honors Section Available.
Prerequisite: JAPN201 or 206.
Textbook: Genki II

 

 

 

JAPN  204:  The Art of Japanese Calligraphy    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Chika Inoue

 

 

 

 

 

This is an introductory course in the art of Shodo, Japanese calligraphy. Students will learn the esthetics and styles of traditional calligraphy through exposure to works done by masters and develop basic brush technique through rigorous practice. Once the rudimentary technique is mastered, students will move on to Japanese Kana poems, such as haiku and tanka, and Chinese Kanji poems. Abstract shodo is also explored.

 

 

Prerequisite: JAP105 Students must purchase their own supplies.

 

 

 

JAPN  301:  Advanced Japanese Grammar    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Mutsuko Sato

 

 

 

 

 

This is a course designed for students who want to achieve a higher level of fluency. The goal is a more natural and native-like use of the language, both in written and oral forms. New grammatical forms, idiomatic and set phrases, Kanji, and vocabulary are introduced. Topics include Japanese geography, technology, foods, pop culture, and education system. There is a final project designed by each student.

 

 

Prerequisite: successful completion in three 200-level Japanese courses or equivalent. Textbook: TOBIRA: Gateway to Advanced Japanese (Chapters 1,3,5,7,9)

 

 

 

JAPN  401:  Reading in the Real World    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Rachael Hutchinson

 

 

 

 

 

The primary aim of this course is to acquire skill in reading and understanding written Japanese texts. Students will build on the skills they have already learned at the 300 level or equivalent. There are many different types of reading, which require different approaches: Reading for the general gist of a piece (skimming), reading to extract specific information (scanning), reading for a more thorough comprehension, and reading for pleasure. There are also many different ways of demonstrating one’s understanding of a text: answering specific questions about it, analyzing it through discussion, and summarizing it in one’s own words. In this course we will discuss, learn and practice these skills so we can tell the difference between different modes of reading and know when best to employ them. Students will be exposed to a variety of text-types, beginning with newspapers and moving through magazine articles and internet resources. The course aims to minimize the student’s dependence on kanji dictionaries in order to get the most out of the individual reading experience. Strategies and tactics for dealing with kanji and new vocabulary will be discussed in detail, and students will be encouraged to share their own techniques with the class.

 

 

Honors section available

 

 

 

Portuguese

 

 

 

PORT  216:  Intensive Brazilian Portuguese for Spanish Students and Speakers    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Carolina Correa

 

 

 

 

 

Study the language of Brazil and unlock the door to this exciting giant of South America. Learning Brazilian Portuguese may not change your life, but then again, maybe it will. Why take a chance?

 

 

Due to their similarities in structure and vocabulary, your knowledge of Spanish will put you on the fast track to learning Portuguese. In this intensive course you can expect to gain a good functional knowledge of this language, which is spoken by 230 million people. You will also learn about Brazilian culture, and Brazilian popular music will be incorporated into our lessons to reinforce language learning. Come prepared to groove to Bossa Nova and other Brazilian rhythms, and to have fun learning a really cool language!

 

 

Prerequisite: One 300-level Spanish course or being a heritage speaker of Spanish.
PORT 216 counts for the Spanish major, Option II, and for the Latin American and Iberian Studies major and minor. It can help students prepare for the winter session in Brazil where they can continue studying Portuguese. It counts for the Brazilian Portuguese Certificate Program when combined with the winter study abroad session in Brazil.

 

 

 

Russian

 

 

 

RUSS  305:  Russian Conversation and Composition through Cinema    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Natallia Cherashneva

 

 

 

 

 

This course explores modern Russian culture and society through the prism of Russian cinema. Students will watch, discuss, analyze, and write about some of the best known Soviet and post-Soviet films, starting with Aleksandrov’s 1936 propaganda vehicle «Цирк» and ending with «Восток-запад», the 1999 exposé of Stalin’s rule and the cold war. Other films include the prize-winning and heart-rending film about World War II «Летят журавли», the much-loved comedies «Иван Васильевич меняет профессию» and «Ирония судьбы» and the anti-war classic «Кавказский пленник». In the process, students will advance their skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. A diverse array of lexical, grammatical, and creative exercises will speed students’ progress toward higher linguistic proficiency.

 

 

Prerequisite: Any 200-level course conducted in Russian (ideally, both RUSS 200 and RUSS 211).

 

 

 

RUSS  465:  Seminar: The Moscow Literary Group “Sreda”    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Julia Hulings

 

 

 

 

 

A powerhouse of young talent, the “Sreda” kruzhok met from 1899-1916 and included artists, musicians, and quite a few notable names in literature at the time, such as Ivan Bunin, Maksim Gorky, and Alexander Kuprin. All three were instrumental in the continuation of the best traditions of Russian classical literature during a time when most of art world was pulsing with anti-realist modernism. These authors persistently carried on the realist democratic tradition of criticism and protest in their prose in the face of the popularity of avant-garde artists like Vasily Kandinsky and Futurist author Vladimir Mayakovsky. Enjoy classic pieces that every Russian knows and every student of Russian should-- Bunin’s “Gentleman from San Francisco” and “Antonov Apples,” Gorky’s “One Autumn” and “Birth of a Man” and Kuprin’s “River of Life” and “The Outrage” --and get a better handle on the artistic and literary scene of the early 1900s.

 

 

Prerequisite: Any 300-level RUSS course

 

 

 

Spanish

 

 

 

SPAN  200:  Spanish Composition and Grammar    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Lee Glen
Fatima Haq
Stacey Hendrix
Asima Saad-Maura

 

 

 

 

 

An intensive study of selected grammatical topics (ser-estar, preterite and imperfect, present subjunctive and commands); vocabulary; grammatical exercises and short compositions. Offered with an Honors section (080). In this course you will acquire new vocabulary, broaden and improve your knowledge of grammatical structures (agreement, verb tenses, pronouns, and much more). You will learn strategies for developing and refining your written communication skills.

 

 

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 107

 

 

 

SPAN  201:  Spanish Reading and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cristina Guardiola
Meghan McInnis-Dominiquez

 

 

Susan McKenna
Asima Saad-Maura

 

 

 

 

 

This course places major emphasis on the development of reading, writing and analytical skills while studying literary selections from Spain and Latin America. In this course the student has the opportunity to read a wide variety of Spanish and Latin American literature in three genres: poetry, narrative and drama. The student will develop reading skills as well as a solid knowledge of the literary terms and movements which will be encountered in more advanced literature classes. Compositions will be based on interpretation of the readings and will be directed towards reinforcing the use of literary terminology.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 200

 

 

 

SPAN  205:  Spanish Conversation: A Cultural Approach    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Carmen Finnicum
Krystyna Musik
America Martinez

 

 

 

 

 

The goal of this course is to enable each learner to achieve increased mastery of practical spoken Spanish in its cultural context. The language will be used strategically – to accomplish objectives and resolve conflicts – in realistic situations. Linguistic and cultural topics include travel, health, geography, education, social interactions, cuisine, sports, housing, family life, entertainment, technology, and business. An array of methodologies is used to build oral competence in real-world situations. Course components include role-playing activities, vocabulary expansion, cultural readings, films and other nonprint media; oral reports, Internet research, listening activities, pronunciation practice, grammar repair and review, short compositions, and an individual final project. The Honors section features additional proficiency activities.

 

 

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 107, SPAN 112, SPAN 200 or SPAN 201. RESTRICTIONS: A minimum grade of B is required in SPAN 107 or SPAN 112. Not intended for native speakers. May not be taken if student has reached the 400 level.

 

 

 

SPAN  300:  Grammar and Composition II    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Staff

 

 

 

 

 

This course is a comprehensive study of basic and complex grammatical structures with both oral and written practice to facilitate further mastery of vocabulary and structures. Cultural topics are explored through readings that raise awareness of the Hispanic world while building up vocabulary to express abstract ideas.

 

 

Prerequisites: SPAN 200 and SPAN 201

 

 

 

SPAN  301:  Survey of Spanish Literature    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jesús Botello

 

 

 

 

 

This course studies the development of Spanish literature from its origins through the 17th century; it is a study of representative works, discussions and collateral readings.

 

 

From the epic poem of the Cid to the riotous adventures of Don Quijote, from the sorceress Celestina to the seductions of Don Juan, from the picaresque novel Lazarillo de Tormes to the philosophical drama La vida es sueño, this course will explore the literature and culture of Spain from the Middle Ages through the Golden Age. Students will gain exposure to classic authors in various genres of Spanish literature, honing critical skills while exploring the evolution and development of Spain's literary genius.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 201
Fulfills Arts & Sciences ‘Group B’ requirement

 

 

 

SPAN  303:  Survey of Spanish-American Literature    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Meghan McInnis-Dominguez
Lee Glen

 

 

 

 

 

Selected readings include representative works in all genres of Latin American literature in the 20th Century, with discussion and analysis, of different texts of various forms of poetry and prose from the Renaissance period to Modernism. We move to another time and South of the Border to learn about the writings of the conquistadores and the authors who lived in the Age of Colonialism, through the revolutions and into the Modern age. You will see how peoples of Spanish-speaking countries viewed the world during several historical epochs. This course provides a comparison of literary works with the arts and unique insights into other cultures.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 201
Fulfills Group B Arts & Science requirement

 

 

 

SPAN  305:  Oral Communication    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ángel Esteban

 

 

 

 

 

For individuals with a comprehensive knowledge of Spanish grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis on refinement of expression of abstract ideas as well as mastery of practical communication.

 

 

You love Spanish. You would love to travel to Spanish-speaking countries. You can read Spanish and you can communicate but you want to be able to have meaningful Spanish conversation. This course is designed to help you speak Spanish more fluently and expand your vocabulary while learning current issues and customs in the Hispanic world. The goal is to enable you to sustain conversations and express your opinions on diverse topics. The course draws from a variety of resources, including short stories and essays, articles from the Spanish press, slides, videos, and satellite newscasts. Interactive formats such as class discussions, debates, oral presentations and scenarios will be used.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 200
Restrictions: Not intended for native speakers

 

 

 

SPAN  314:  Spanish Phonetics and Phonology    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Tomás McCone

 

 

 

 

 

One of the most neglected aspects of learning to speak Spanish is the ability to create authentic sounding utterances that closely resemble the ones generated by native speakers. Not only does this mastery of the way Spanish is spoken improve the intelligibility of your speech to both native and non-native speakers, but it provides you with unparalleled confidence in using the language in every day conversation. Through practical exercises designed to sharpen your hearing and transform your pronunciation of Spanish phonemes, you will begin the process of understanding how the Spanish sound system works, how its sounds are articulated and transcribed, how its vowels and consonants manifest themselves in different phonological environments, how Spanish words are divided into syllables and how this syllable structure influences where and when to use written accent marks. In addition, some of the features that give rise to different dialects of Spanish will be discussed with an eye to identifying how these dialects differ. If you’ve always wanted to sound more like a native speaker, this is the course for you!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPAN  325:  Spanish Civilization and Culture    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Angel Esteban

 

 

 

 

 

Survey of geography, history, art and society of Spain. This course offers a survey of the geography, history, culture, politics and society of Spain. You will study key historical events, from prehistoric times to the most recent developments, as well as cultural movements that have shaped Spanish national identity. The course is conducted in Spanish and the readings are in Spanish.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 200
Fulfills ‘Group B’ Arts & Science requirement
Required for teaching majors.

 

 

 

SPAN  326:  Latin American Civilization and Culture    (3 credits)

 

 

 

America Martinez

 

 

 

 

 

This is a student-centered class in which students will research and analyze fundamental aspects of the geography, history, politics and cultural production of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the present. We place particular emphasis on questions of human rights, colonialism and nationalism, intervention, and globalization and migration. This is a process-oriented course, in which students are encouraged to:

  • Discover the historical causes of modern-day problems in Latin America;
  • Improve research and analytical skills;
  • Develop independent learning skills;
  • Master practical academic and presentation technologies.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 200.
Fulfills Arts & Sciences ‘Group B’requirement.

 

 

 

SPAN  401:  Advanced Spanish Grammar II    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Asima Saad-Maura

 

 

 

 

 

SPAN 401 is not a systematic study of Spanish grammar (that is the purpose of SPAN 200 and 300). In this course students will practice and apply what they have learned in previous courses, as well as broaden their vocabulary through different kinds of writings (i.e.: summaries, opinion papers, narrations, feature articles, descriptions, poems, short stories, etc.), projects and class participation. Furthermore, they will have the opportunity to study and practice more in-depth those structures that traditionally cause the most problems. For example: subjunctive vs. indicative, past tenses, prepositions and pronouns, reflexivity, active vs. passive, text progression, determination, word order, direct vs. indirect speech, sequence of tenses, use of complex tenses, etc. The SPAN 401 textbook contains an array of authentic readings about the culture, history, and politics of Spain and Latin America. The overall goal of SPAN 401 is to help students reach the ACTFL Language Testing Advanced-Low Level.

 

 

Prerequisite: This course is the last in a series of Spanish language courses. Students must have taken SPAN 200 and SPAN 300 before enrolling for this course. The course is conducted in Spanish.

 

 

 

SPAN  436:  Topics: Literature of the Spanish Golden Age: EL TEATRO DEL SIGLO DE ORO    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jesus Botello

 

 

 

 

 

This course explores Spain's extraordinary national theater during XVI and XVII centuries. We will read masterpieces by Lope de Vega, Calderón de la Barca, Cervantes and Tirso de Molina, among others. We will focus on the plays as literary texts, but also on other less-known aspects of theater: The production of plays, the theaters ("corrales") and the public, and literary and moral controversies about the comedias, actors, and authors.

 

 

Prerequisite: One 300-level survey of literature course.

 

 

 

SPAN  455/655:  Literatura Hispánica 19th and 20th centuries    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Angel Esteban

 

 

 

 

 

In this course we will study Hispanic Literature of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century in its historical and cultural contexts, in principal Latin American Modernism, from José Martí, the hero of the Cuban Independence, to Amado Nervo, the Mexican poet, studying also the works of Manuel Gutiérrez Nájera, José Asunción silva, Julián del Casal, Rubén Darío, José Enrique Rodíó, Julio Herrera y Reissig, Delmira Agustini, etc.

 

 

 

SPAN  460:  Post Civil-War Spain in Literature and Film    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Joan L. Brown

 

 

 

 

 

Although the Spanish Civil War took place in the first half of the twentieth century (1936-39), its aftermath still affects Spain today. This course focuses on the literature and film of post-Civil War Spain, from 1939 to the present. Readings include novels written under censorship as well as novels published during and after Spain’s transition to democracy; films from the Franco and post-Franco eras will also be studied. Students will be asked to engage actively with each text, devising and defending their own interpretations orally and in writing. Through intensive reading, writing, speaking and listening, each student will build his or her linguistic and analytical skills in Spanish.

 

 

Prerequisite: One 300-level survey of literature course.

 

 

 

SPAN  460-080:  Post Civil-War Spain in Literature and Film    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Joan L. Brown

 

 

 

 

 

How did the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War shape present-day Spain? In this honors undergraduate/graduate seminar we will explore the far-reaching effects of the postwar era in Spanish literature and film. Print and non-print texts range from gripping individual stories to sweeping sagas of war and remembrance. Topics include censorship during the Franco era (1939-1975), Spain’s transition to democracy and the “pact of forgetting” (1975-82), and the recovery of historical memory (1976-present). This course is a discussion-based seminar that supports individual critical engagement with diverse texts. Through intensive reading, writing, listening and speaking, students will enhance their linguistic and analytical skills in Spanish.

 

 

Prerequisite: One 300-level survey of literature course (Spanish or Latin American).

 

 

 

SPAN  475-011:  Graphic Transgressions: Breakthroughs in Modern Latin American Art and Culture    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Philip Penix-Tadsen

 

 

 

 

 

Breakthrough movements transgress traditional boundaries and carry their fields of enunciation to new heights. This course traces innovations in Latin American art and culture in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will examine literary and poetic breakthroughs and their relationships to the visual arts, focusing on varying approaches to abstraction, conceptualism, and political activism in contemporary Latin American cultural production.

 

 

Prerequisite: Any of the following: SPAN307, SPAN308, SPAN325, SPAN326.

 

 

 

SPAN  475/675-010:  Media-Savvy Populism in Contemporary Latin America    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Phillip Penix-Tadsen

 

 

 

 

 

From Che to Chávez From the Cuban Revolution to the presidencies of Hugo Chávez and his allies in present-day Latin America, populist political movements have incorporated multiple media into their efforts to revolutionize the lives of "the people." This course will focus on essays, speeches, fiction, television, film, visual arts, online production, and performance, exploring how populist movements have used media to transform the political environment of the region today.

 

 

Prerequisite: Any of the following: SPAN307, SPAN308, SPAN325, SPAN326.

 

 

 

SPAN  490:  Capstone Seminar in Hispanic Literature: HISTORICAL LIT: THEN AND NOW    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cristina Guardiola-Griffiths

 

 

 

 

 

What’s Past is Present: "The one duty we owe to history is to rewrite it." This Oscar Wilde quote informs the our course on Historical Fiction. In it, we will read novels and other narrative to come up with a working definition of the genre. We will discuss the relationships authors of historical fiction have with the world around them, while exploring their social, political, and economic commentary as manifested in the narrative. Parallels with other genres (postapocalyptic novels and film: the horror story, the zombie narrative) also may be explored

 

 

What’s Past is Present: "El único deber que tenemos a la historia es el de escribirla de nuevo.” Estas palabras de Óscar Wilde informan el curso nuestro, en el que leeremos obras de historia ficción tanto del pasado como del presente. Nuestras metas son las de establecer una definición de lo que significa la historia ficción y lo que pretende hacer para el lector. Paralelos con otros géneros literarios (la novela postapocalíptica y filme: la historia de horror, el cuento del zombie) también pudieran ser estudiadas

 

 

 

SPAN  491:  Latin American Studies Capstone: NEW MEDIA & NEW DIRECTIONS    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Philip Penix-Tadsen

 

 

 

 

 

Technological advances have spurred cultural transformations for the entire course of human existence, defining the contours of what a given culture can create in its particular historical moment. This course examines how new media forms and creative innovations have transformed Latin America from the 20th to the 21st century, beginning with an exploration of how “new media” is defined and theorized, and continuing with the study of cultural production from the region. Over the course of the semester, we will investigate the theme of new media and new directions through the analysis of literature, film, online projects, video games, visual arts and performance, examining a diverse array of perspectives on this inherently interdisciplinary, multi-media topic.

 

 

 

SPAN  636:  Topics: Literature of the Spanish Golden Age: EL TEATRO DEL SIGLO DE ORO    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jesus Botello

 

 

 

 

 

This course explores Spain's extraordinary national theater during XVI and XVII centuries. We will read masterpieces by Lope de Vega, Calderón de la Barca, Cervantes and Tirso de Molina, among others. We will focus on the plays as literary texts, but also on other less-known aspects of theater: The production of plays, the theaters ("corrales") and the public, and literary and moral controversies about the comedias, actors, and authors.

 

 

 

SPAN  660:  Post Civil-War Spain in Literature and Film    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Joan L. Brown

 

 

 

 

 

How did the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War shape present-day Spain? In this graduate/honors undergraduate seminar, we will explore the far-reaching effects of the postwar era in Spanish literature and film. Print and non-print texts range from gripping individual stories to sweeping sagas of war and remembrance. Topics include censorship during the Franco era (1939-1975), Spain’s transition to democracy and the “pact of forgetting” (1975-82), and the recovery of historical memory (1976-present). This course is a discussion-based seminar that supports individual critical engagement with diverse texts. Through intensive reading, writing, listening and speaking, students will enhance their linguistic and analytical skills in Spanish.

 

 

 

SPAN  675:  Media-Savvy Populism in Contemporary Latin America    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Philip Penix-Tadsen

 

 

 

 

 

From Che to Chávez, from the Cuban Revolution to the presidencies of Hugo Chávez and his allies in present-day Latin America, populist political movements have incorporated multiple media into their efforts to revolutionize the lives of "the people." This course will focus on essays, speeches, fiction, television, film, visual arts, online production, and performance, exploring how populist movements have used media to transform the political environment of the region today.

 

 

 

SPAN  875:  Topics in Spanish Literature: LA CELESTINA    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cristina Maria Guardiola-Griffiths

 

 

 

 

 

In this course on Fernando de Rojas’s Celestina, we will study the literary, social, economic, and cultural movements of the late middle ages. (Other works related to the Celestina and/or on the Master’s List may also be used as tools for understanding Rojas’s masterpiece.)

 

 

Como objetivo básico tenemos el desarrollar una perspectiva crítica razonada con la lectura y comentario de texto para apreciar las corrientes literarias y aspectos culturales y sociales que aparecen en los textos incluidos en el curso. Además de la obra de Fernando de Rojas, se estudiarán otros textos relacionados con La Celestina que pudieran verse en la lista de maestría.