Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures

University of Delaware

 

Student Friendly Course Descriptions

 

Level 200 and Above – Spring 2015 Courses

 

 

 

 

 

Arabic

 

 

Chinese

 

Classics

 

FLLT

 

 

 

 

German

 

 

Hebrew

 

Italian

 

Japanese

 

 

Portuguese

 

 

 French

 

Russian

 

Spanish

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arabic

 

 

 

ARAB  200:  Advanced Intermediate Arabic    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ikram Masmoudi

 

 

 

 

 

A continuation of ARAB 107. Emphasis is on reading and viewing authentic materials from Arab media, in order to improve reading and listening skills, and to increase knowledge of Arab culture.

 

 

Prerequisite: ARAB 107

 

 

 

Chinese

 

 

 

CHIN  201:  Advanced Intermediate Chinese I    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Renee Dong

 

 

 

 

 

This course is designed for students who have completed the 100-level Chinese language courses at UD, or those who have achieved an intermediate level of proficiency with the language. It is a four-skilled course with training in all areas of language use. However, there is a strong emphasis on reading and listening comprehension. Students will be exposed to authentic and communicative materials from formal textbooks, supplementary listening exercises and pop music.

 

 

Specifically students will develop and adopt more sophisticated comprehension strategies for both listening and reading (in characters); be able to understand more complex and abstract topics such as those about art, social phenomena and cultural exchange; improve comprehension and production accuracy with the use of intermediate-level sentence patterns, grammar points and vocabularies, expand and build formal vocabularies used mostly in written language; and develop a deeper understanding of contemporary Chinese culture.

 

 

Prerequisite : CHIN107 or with the instructor's approval

 

 

 

CHIN  355:  Advanced Readings in Chinese    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Renee Dong

 

 

 

 

 

This course is designed to further improve students’ integrated language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing through spoken dialogues, original television programs, and films. Students will develop their abilities to comprehend authentic language materials, understand the distinguishing features of spoken and written Chinese, and produce paragraph-level Chinese on familiar topics. Besides language objectives, the class also helps students to expand their knowledge of contemporary Chinese society and culture.

 

 

Prerequisites: Two courses at the 200-level, one of which must be CHIN 200 or CHIN 205, or instructor’s permission.
Honors students will read one more essay and give an oral presentation on that essay.

 

 

 

CHIN  455:  Classical Chinese    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Haihong Yang

 

 

 

 

 

This class offers basic training in classical Chinese. Classical Chinese is a language shaped in the latter half of the first millenium B.C. that still persists as a living medium of expression today. Knowledge of classical Chinese is important to help students read and understand sophisticated modern Chinese texts, which make frequent use of classical allusions and constructs. In this course, students will be introduced to basic grammatical structures of classical Chinese, its syntactic patterns and historical development. We will focus on grammar, systematic sentence analysis, and distinctive functions of grammatical particles through translation and discussion in class focusing on grammar and vocabulary. The course is taught in English and Chinese.

 

 

Honor students will read one more passage and give an oral presentation on that passage.
Prerequisites: Two CHIN courses at the 300 level and one CHIN course at the 400 level.

 

 

 

CHIN  467:  Readings in Chinese Culture II    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jianguo Chen

 

 

 

 

 

This course aims to improve students’ reading and writing proficiency through rigorously reading and responding to literary works and essays related to the issues facing Chinese intellectuals. Students will have chance to develop their skills to accomplish abstract reasoning in addition to being able to narrate and describe. The selected essays will provide an intensive look at some of the most important social and cultural issues in modern and contemporary China. The course may have a dual-track approach, requiring the completion of both class-wide and individually designed projects.

 

 

Honors option available (section 080).
Honors students will read one more essay and give and oral presentation on that essay.

 

 

 

Classics

 

 

 

LATN  102:  Elementary Latin II    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Margaret Laird

 

 

 

 

 

The course continues work begun in Elementary Latin I, focusing primarily on learning the fundamentals of Latin grammar (morphology and syntax) and vocabulary as well as understanding Latin’s influence on the English language. By the end of the semester, students will be able to read complex passages in the original Latin and understand the role of literature in ancient Roman life and culture.

 

 

 

LATN  202:  Intermediate Latin Poetry    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Margaret Laird

 

 

 

 

 

The course will develop skills in reading Latin poetry by focusing on selections from Virgil’s Aeneid. In addition to analyzing aspects of grammar and poetic style and themes, we will consider the poem’s cultural role in the Augustan period.

 

 

 

 

 

GREK  202/302:  Intermediate and Advanced Intermediate Ancient Greek Poetry    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Annette Giesecke

 

 

 

 

 

Students will read selections from Homer's Iliad in the original Greek, with particular focus on the Homeric Question and the historicity of the Trojan War.

 

 

 

FLLT

 

 

 

FLLT  329:  Italian Cinema    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Giorgio Melloni

 

 

 

 

 

In this course a range of films and film clips will guide us through an examination of the impact and the importance that Italian cinema has had on the history of world cinema and culture. The history of Italian film is one that fluctuates between two separate poles: artistic innovation and commercial instinct. This is obvious from the very beginning of film history. For example, in 1914, Italy introduced two major innovations (the first feature film and the first use of the camera dolly) that are still readily apparent in modern cinema, both in one film, Cabiria. This course is taught entirely in English.

 

 

 

FLLT  330:  Love and Trauma: Contemporary Novels by Chinese Women Writers    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Maria Tu

 

 

 

 

 

Through readings in feminist theories, psychology, philosophy, and religion, this course helps students explore, by means of a close textual analysis of the novels written by Chinese women writers, the roots of human sufferings and contentment, depression and jouissance in the forms of love and trauma that both empower and plague women universally. The interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspectives adopted in this course will shed light on the sub-conscious energy in human mind and how it gives rise to the feelings of love, passion, or conversely, the feelings of trauma, and depression as experienced by women. This course raises and addresses the following questions: What are the ontological and psychological interpretations of love? What is the difference between love and desire? What is the connection between our deep consciousness and femininity? How can the traumatic wounds arising from love be self-healed? How does one’s Asian cultural background contribute to this goal? Selected films and power-point slides will be used to complement the lectures and in-class discussion. Students will complete several short writing assignments and a semester-long research project.

 

 

This course fulfills second language writing and group B.

 

 

 

FLLT  331:  Love, Death, and Gender in Chinese Films    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jianguo Chen

 

 

 

 

 

This course introduces students to the treatment of recurring themes in Chinese films such as those related to various forms of love, death, and gender roles. Specifically, the course examines issues of love (passion, desire, and revenge), death, sexuality, masculinity and femininity in relation to those of duty (filial piety, loyalty to the state, etc.), politics and nationalism. The course will also focus on the issues of gender politics and female sexuality of various ideological persuasions and psychological dispositions and on how such issues are articulated cinematically both from historical and contemporary perspectives. The course not only introduces students to Chinese culture/society through the cinematic perspective, but acquaints them with a knowledge of Chinese film aesthetic (the cinematic language) and film making on the other. The comparative approach adopted in the course will enable students to appreciate and explore cultural differences and similarities between Chinese and Western cultures in terms of the issues under discussion.

 

 

This course fulfills Multicultural requirements and counts towards Chinese Minor and East Asian Studies Major.
Prerequisites: None. No previous knowledge of Chinese culture required.
Honors section available (080).

 

 

 

FLLT  332:  Thousand and One Nights    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ikram Masmoudi

 

 

 

 

 

"Thousand and One Nights” explores the origin, transformation and translation of this fundamental collection of stories. The course examines the various adaptations of the Nights and their impact on world literature.

 

 

In English - Open to all - No Arabic required!

 

 

 

FLLT  338-010/011:  Issues in Japanese Film    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Rachael Hutchinson

 

 

 

 

 

This course acquaints students with both famous and little-known works of Japanese cinema, and reassesses how these films have been treated in the literature to date. By examining Japanese films through a number of different thematic issues, we can avoid the monolithic and teleological narrative of ‘national cinema’ that has so often been applied to Japanese film. Topics for discussion will include the cinematics of violence, censorship in postwar Japan, and discourses of adaptation and the remake. We will study Kurosawa Akira’s samurai films and their relationship to Hollywood, the 1970s yakuza film and its modern incarnation in the films of Takeshi Kitano, and representations of gender and the family in Japanese film. Anime works such as Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind and Ghost in the Shell will be considered in historical context to demonstrate currents of thought in the Japanese film industry and society as a whole.

 

 

Honors section available

 

 

 

FLLT  421/621-010:  Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cynthia Lees

 

 

 

 

 

What are the essential skills and knowledge foreign language teachers need to acquire in order to be effective educators? What are the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines and the National Standards for Foreign Language Education and why do they matter? How does an integrated curriculum support communicative language teaching? What are the key components of effective assessment that provide helpful feedback for students? What are the benefits of layering or sequencing multiple activities into a coherent progression that builds on previously taught material? What is the role of authentic texts and materials in the classroom? How does being a member of a professional language community keep educators abreast of recent pedagogical developments? These are some of the questions that future language educators explore in this Methods course. Also included are practical strategies and techniques along with sample learning tasks for use in K-12 classrooms. FLLT 421 is required of all Foreign Language Education majors. Upper class standing and proficiency in the target language are expected.

 

 

Required for junior FL Education majors.

 

 

 

FLLT  429/629:  Methods of Teaching Foreign/Second Languages in Elementary Schools    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Iris Busch

 

 

 

 

 

Have you ever asked yourself why children have a reputation for being natural language learners? Languages and children are a perfect match. Every skill and outcome that is important to society is introduced through the elementary school curriculum. Foreign languages must have a secure place in the K-8 curriculum. The course will highlight the principles and strategies for teaching languages to children with their distinctive characteristics and needs. Focus is on curriculum design, lesson planning, classroom management and advocacy. There will be games, songs and chants. And of course: Stories.

 

 

Practical experiences include teaching and observing at the University's Early Learning Center.

 

 

Cross-listed with EDUC 429

 

 

 

FLLT  491:  Foreign Language Education Capstone    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Iris Busch

 

 

 

 

 

This course, which accompanies your student teaching placement, constitutes a forum in which you will share experiences and reflect on your teaching, benefiting from interaction with your peers and guidance from your supervisors. You will consider together how to apply and increase your knowledge as scholars of foreign language in effective lesson planning and assessment, how to meet classroom management challenges, how to develop leadership skills, and how to cultivate partnerships with students, colleagues, administrators and parents.

 

 

Assistance and guidance with the job search will be provided.

 

 

Open only to student teachers in the Foreign Language Education Program.

 

 

 

FLLT  622:  Language Syllabus and Materials Development    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jorge Cubillos

 

 

 

 

 

Wondering how to select a textbook, or how to put together the syllabus for your next language course? Interested in creating your own teaching materials? This course will give you the opportunity to learn about the latest approaches to syllabus and materials design, while giving you extensive hands-on experience in the creation of your own classroom tasks and homework assignments.

 

 

Note: Special emphasis will be given to the enhancement of your proficiency in the use of technology for the teaching and learning of foreign languages.

 

 

 

French

 

 

 

FREN  200-010/080:  French Grammar and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Flora Poindexter

 

 

 

 

 

This course provides a comprehensive grammar review, as well as an exploration of more advanced structures, in conjunction with an introduction to reading skills and strategies. Students complete grammar exercises, build vocabulary, respond to comprehension questions on the readings, and write short essays in order to improve their language skills. The reading material will consist of modern short stories, and film will also be incorporated.

 

 

This course may be taken for Honors credit. It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.
Prerequisite: FREN 107.

 

 

 

FREN  209:  French Conversation through Film    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cynthia Lees

 

 

 

 

 

A conversation course contextualized in mainstream films including animation, this class invites you to build and to practice your oral and aural skills in French by watching and discussing a variety of cinematic products from the French-speaking world. Some films are as close as your nearest laptop, and you will actively blog reactions at our class website.

 

 

May be taken for Honors credit. It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.
FREN 209 can be used to satisfy the French major requirement of a 2xx or 2xx/3xx course.
Prerequisite: FREN 107 or one 200-level French course. Minimum grade of B required for prerequisites.

 

 

 

FREN  211-010/080:  French Reading and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Karen Quandt

 

 

 

 

 

This course includes reading and discussion of French literature and the writing of short papers. The emphasis of the course is on improving critical reading skills and on writing formal analyses of literature. Students will be introduced to several literary movements. Honors credit involves supplementary readings, papers and meetings outside of class with the professor. Grammar review is also incorporated.

 

 

This course may be taken for Honors credit. It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.
Prerequisite: FREN 200 (minimum grade of C) or FREN 107 (minimum grade of A-)
Satisfies ‘Group A’ Arts and Science breadth requirement.

 

 

 

FREN  211-011/081:  French Reading and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Donna Coulet-Dugard

 

 

 

 

 

This course includes reading and discussion of French literature and the writing of short papers. The emphasis of the course is on improving critical reading skills and on writing formal analyses of literature. Students will be introduced to several literary movements. Honors credit involves supplementary readings, papers and meetings outside of class with the professor. Grammar review is also incorporated.

 

 

Prerequisite: FREN 200 (minimum grade of C) or FREN 107 (minimum grade of A-)
Satisfies ‘Group A’ Arts and Science breadth requirement.

 

 

 

FREN  301-010/080:  Introduction to French Literature – Prose    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Bruno Thibault

 

 

 

 

 

Selected readings, with discussion and analysis, of the various genres of prose fiction.

 

 

You love literature, you love French, you love to read, but you’re sometimes unsure how to best approach a text and formulate your thoughts about it? Then FREN 301 and FREN 302 are designed for you. They will focus on the literary genres and their evolution in the major literary movements. A close reading of the texts will enable students to develop strategies for analyzing narrative techniques, poetic forms, dramatic structure. FREN 301 will focus on prose; FREN 302 will focus on poetry and theater.

 

 

What purpose did Montaigne have in mind when he penned his famous Essais? What makes Chateaubriand's René such a typical Romantic hero? Are Proust's sentences as meandrous and insidious as you've always heard they were? This course explores a few masterpieces in French prose from the Renaissance through the twentieth century. Along the way, you'll discover the science fiction of Voltaire, you’ll experience le mal du siècle with Chateaubriand, you’ll meet a humble servant and a colorful parrot in a short story by Flaubert, and you’ll reflect on phenomenology and war in Sartre’s “Le Mur”. Furthermore, you will learn the various methods of literary analysis as you perform close readings and explications de texte.

 

 

This course may be taken for Honors credit. It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.
Prerequisites: FREN 211, and any 200-level course taught in the French language, both with a suggested minimum grade of B-.
Satisfies ‘Group B’ Arts and Science breadth requirement.

 

 

 

FREN  314-010/080:  French Phonetics    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ali Alalou

 

 

 

 

 

Studies the sounds of the French language (both individual phonemes and items of connected speech, such as liaison, linking, intonation, etc). Helps improve pronunciation of the language.

 

 

Do you know the difference between the pronunciation of “Louis” and “lui”? Do you still choke over your French “r”? Are you unsure of when to pronounce final consonants and when to drop them? Do Frenchmen pick you out as American as soon as you pronounce the first syllable of what you thought was their language? Then FREN 314 may be the course for you! Two hours of each week are spent learning the rules of pronunciation, practicing auditory discrimination, and transcribing French discourse, using the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet); one hour a week is given to practicing the sounds in small groups. Oral exercises to accompany the textbook are available on the Internet.

 

 

Prerequisites: Any two 200-level courses taught in the French language, both with a suggested minimum grade of B-.
This course may be taken for Honors credit. It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.

 

 

 

FREN  350-010/080:  Business French    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Dr. Cynthia Lees

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know that France is one of the four largest industrial economies in the world and is the world's second largest agricultural producer? This course invites you to make French your business! You’ll explore traditional topics such as start-ups, types of corporations and partnerships, French banking and financial services, the stock market, product development and marketing, and shipping and international commerce, all the while acquiring a substantial vocabulary base in Business French. Other practical topics include business case studies, interviewing and working in France, preparing a cover letter and CV, and drafting a variety of business correspondence. A course with wide appeal, this class is particularly helpful to students thinking about a career either at home or abroad in Accounting, Economics, International Business Studies, International Relations, Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management, Marketing, and Foreign Language Studies. May be taken for Honors credit.

 

 

Prerequisite: Any two 200-level courses taught in French. Fulfills a 3xx course requirement for the French major.
This course may be taken for Honors credit. It is highly recommended that those pursuing Honors credit for this course have earned final grades of A or A- in previous French coursework.

 

 

 

FREN  405:  Translation and Stylistics    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Deborah Steinberger

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s the advanced-level language course you’ve been looking for! Expand your vocabulary and improve your writing style as you study the fascinating craft of translation. Working in groups to translate various texts (literary, journalistic, commercial) from French to English and vice versa, students enrolled in this course will acquire a marketable skill as well as enhanced knowledge of French and Francophone culture. Activities may include composing film subtitles and simultaneous interpretation.

 

 

Prerequisites: Two 300-level French courses with a minimum grade of B+.

 

 

 

FREN  455/655:  Of Pens and Palettes: World and Image in 19th-Century French Art and Literature    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Karen Quandt

 

 

 

 

 

This course will examine the sometimes collaborative, sometimes strained exchange between French artists and writers throughout the long 19th century. Was the language of poetry, set against the cultural and social phenomena of technology, science, and secularization, no longer pertinent to a jaded, positivist times? Was painting, which seduced the eye with the illusion of reality, the sign of a degenerate society that had lost its poetic and intellectual sensibilities? Examining the major movements in both art and literature, we will concentrate on French writers and poets who were also art critics and theorists; painters who called themselves poets; and poets who were also visual artists. Along with readings, images in a variety of media such as paintings, drawings, and sculpture will be integral to class discussions. Particular focus will be placed on the cultural politics of the Salon and the increasing focus on the representation of urban life. Key texts include Balzac’s Le Chef-d’oeuvre inconnu and La Fille aux yeux d’or; Baudelaire’s Salon writings (in conjunction with Les Fleurs du mal); Zola’s L’Oeuvre; and Apollinaire’s Calligrammes. The major artists or art movements to be considered are Delacroix, the Barbizon School, Courbet, Manet, Cézanne, and Impressionism.

 

 

Though not yet confirmed, plans for a class trip to the recently relocated Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia are currently being explored.

 

 

Prerequisites: Any two 300-level French literature courses.

 

 

 

FREN  875:  20th Century French Literature- Age of Anxiety and Absurd    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Bruno Thibault

 

 

 

 

 

Do you think one can envision a world without a divine plan? Without divine transcendence are men and women condemned to immorality and violence? Can violence and war lead to freedom and justice? When is rebellion justified? Is authentic art the expression of subconscious drives? In this class, we will discuss these themes and other related issues through close readings of masterpieces of French literature published during the interwar era, 1914-1944 (novels, essays and plays by Gide, Yourcenar, Sartre, Beauvoir and Camus). Special attention will be devoted to Surrealism (Breton, Éluard, Aragon, Char, Michaux) and Existentialism.

 

 

Enrollment is restricted to graduate students.

 

 

 

German

 

 

 

GRMN  200:  German Grammar Review    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ester Riehl

 

 

 

 

 

Have you taken every 100-level German class but are still not sure where to place the verb? Are you still taking wild guesses on adjective endings? Do you rely a little too heavily on your imagination in order to form past participles? Then GRMN 200 may be just right for you! This course is designed to provide you with an opportunity to improve and refine your basic language skills, thus building greater confidence and proficiency. Our systematic review of grammar will include exercises and activities for honing writing and speaking skills. There will be quizzes, some short essays, a midterm exam and a final project.

 

 

Prerequisite: GRMN 107 or the equivalent.

 

 

 

GRMN  255:  Germany in the News    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Nancy Nobile

 

 

 

 

 

What are the hopes and concerns of people in today's Germany? What role does Germany play in the expanding focus of the European Union? What are the most talked about cultural issues of the day? To find answers to these and other questions, we’ll read and discuss online newspaper and magazine articles, and view excerpts from German TV news. Discussion of emergent issues in Germany — from pop culture to politics — will improve your speaking, reading, and listening skills. In increments over the course of the semester, students will create their own newspapers. They will be asked to participate frequently in class discussions, to give one group presentation, and to take midterm and final exams.

 

 

Prerequisite: GRMN 107 or the equivalent.

 

 

 

GRMN  355-010:  German Literature for Young Readers (Jugendliteratur)    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Nancy Nobile

 

 

 

 

 

As the huge success of the Harry Potter series demonstrates, literature for “young readers” can captivate people of all ages. In this course we’ll consider some works intended specifically for children, and others that appeal more generally to the young (at heart). These texts — and the vivid illustrations that accompany some of them — will enable us to see how notions of childhood have changed since the early 19th century. We’ll read some gruesome tales designed to instill good habits and moral behavior (Grimms’ Märchen, H. Hoffmann’s Der Struwwelpeter), as well as stories that show us the world through childrens’ eyes and thereby critque adult society (W. Busch, Max und Moritz, E. Kästner, Emil und die Detektive, M. Ende, Momo). For a 21st-century look at Jugendliteratur, we’ll read Christmas stories by Karen Duve (Weihnachten mit Thomas Müller and Thomas Müller und der Zirkusbär). Students will be asked to write several essays, but creative assignments will be encouraged as well. There will be a midterm and a final exam.

 

 

Prerequisite: for majors: any three 200-level courses taught in German.
for minors: any two 200-level courses taught in German.

 

 

 

GRMN  355-011:  The 20th Century in Film    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ester Riehl

 

 

 

 

 

Film emerged as an exciting and frightening new communications medium of the 20th century. Whether intended to spread political propaganda, provide an entertaining escape from daily life, or to experiment with new ways of expressing art forms and ideas, film came to be a powerful tool that both shaped and reflected German experiences throughout the century. Examining films from the 20th century will bring us closer to an understanding of the social, political and historical contexts from which they emerged. The goals of the course are to introduce students to some of the major cultural and political issues of the 20th century in Germany, learn to recognize and interpret cinematic techniques, and improve students’ German language skills. Students will write several short papers, two essays, and a midterm and final exam.

 

 

Prerequisite: for majors: any three 200-level courses taught in German.
for minors: any two 200-level courses taught in German.

 

 

 

GRMN  455-010:  Berlin in Literature and Art    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Ester Riehl

 

 

 

 

 

The city of Berlin has stood at the center of Germany’s political and social turmoil for centuries. Its architecture remains a physical symbol of Prussia’s rise to power and still contains remnants of Hitler’s mad plans for an empire. The wall that cut the city in half was the central symbol of the Cold War. What did Berlin mean throughout the tumult of Germany’s history? What does it mean today? We’ll ask those questions as we read and discuss literary texts from 19th to the 21st centuries, from such authors as Theodor Fontane, Irmgard Keun, Peter Schneider and Thomas Brussig. In addition to these literary texts we will examine films, music, paintings and photography to explore the history and image of Germany’s capital city. Students will complete several short writing assignments, two essays, as well as a midterm and final exam.

 

 

Prerequisite: for majors: any three 300-level courses taught in German.
for minors: any two 300-level courses taught in German.

 

 

 

GRMN  455-011:  Tales of Love and Romance    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Monika Shafi

 

 

 

 

 

Love and romance rank among the oldest, most familiar, and most popular themes in literature and in film. Why we fall in — or out of — love, how we express emotions for which language seems inadequate, and how ideas of love, romance, and marriage change over times — such questions have baffled authors for centuries and continue to intrigue them. In this course we will examine the depiction of romantic love, marriage, and betrayal within social, cultural, and economic contexts starting in the 18th century and ending with contemporary stories exploring the impact of the internet on relationships. We will also discuss select contemporary films. Students will write several short assignments as well as two essays and take a midterm and final exam.

 

 

Prerequisite: for majors: any three 300-level courses taught in German.
for minors: any two 300-level courses taught in German.

 

 

 

Hebrew

 

 

 

HEBR  205:  Hebrew Conversation    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Eynat Gutman

 

 

 

 

 

Come and strengthen your conversational skills, learn/improve future tense, and be exposed to Israeli culture, through discussions, conversations, texts, audio and visual material – and have fun.

 

 

In this course, our main focus is perfecting our speaking and listening skills, although some emphasis is put on reading and writing. The students who come to Conversational Hebrew are expected to be proficient in the present and past tenses, and able to apply all language skills to many of the following topics: the University, food, family, body parts, aches and pains, the days of the week and time. Throughout the course, the students will carry discussions, conversations, perform pair-work, and listen to auditory and visual materials. The topics of this semester will include “the revival of Hebrew,” “my future home” and “future plans.” Grammatically, we will focus mainly on acquiring the future tense in conversation and writing.

 

 

Prerequisite: HEBR 107 or professor’s permission (students who had 3-4 years of Hebrew in high school are usually also good candidates for this course. Other students may qualify!)
The course is cross-listed with JWST, and may be taken towards the minor in Jewish Studies, see the professor for details.

 

 

 

Italian

 

 

 

ITAL  200:  Italian Grammar Review    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Laura Salsini

 

 

 

 

 

You want to learn a second language, but you're afraid of being bored. Then take this opportunity to change your opinion! You will be engaged in learning Italian and its grammar through short stories, films, music, debates and many other activities. Don’t hesitate! Choose Italian 200!

 

 

Prerequisite: ITAL 107
Honors credit available

 

 

 

ITAL  211:  Italian Reading and Composition: Short Fiction    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Riccarda Saggese

 

 

 

 

 

Let the masters of the Italian short story teach you how to write! This course emphasizes vocabulary acquisition and written expression. Students will read and discuss short works of literature and film. You will improve your writing skills, add to your rich stock of conversation topics in Italian, and begin your love affair with contemporary Italian authors.

 

 

Prerequisite: Ital 200, Ital205, or Ital206
Honors section available
Counts as Group A requirement

 

 

 

ITAL  250:  Introduction to Business Italian    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Riccarda Saggese

 

 

 

 

 

Are you thinking about your future job? Do you want to work for an Italian company or one that does business in Italy? Take this course and do not miss the opportunity to acquire the basics of the language of business and trade, along with the cultural knowledge necessary for effective interaction in the working environment of the Italian company.

 

 

This course familiarizes students with central components of business Italian (vocabulary, technology, terminology and syntactical patterns) and aspects of the Italian business community. It reinforces strategies for understanding, interpreting, and responding to new information, and providing opportunities for interactive practice.

 

 

Prerequisite: ITAL 107

 

 

 

ITAL  305:  Advanced Italian Conversation and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Giorgio Melloni

 

 

 

 

 

This course teaches Italian conversation and composition through a variety of materials: Italian newspaper and magazine short articles, film, Internet research, etc. The themes of the course are content-based and will explore the crucial importance of the diverse cultural local culture of regions and dialects for contemporary Italian identity in the age of globalization. Emphasis is on improving conversational fluency, pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening comprehension skills as well as writing skills.

 

 

Prerequisite: Ital 211 or Ital 212
Available for Honors Credit

 

 

 

ITAL  325:  Italian Civilization and Culture I    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Meredith Ray

 

 

 

 

 

This course surveys the major cultural, social and political developments in Italy from the Etruscans to the 16th century. Learn about the rise and fall of the Roman Empire! Find out how the Medici family made Florence the center of Renaissance culture! Discover Italy’s contributions to the development of modern science! Course materials include readings, films, and a video game segment.

 

 

Prerequisite: ITAL 211 or 212
Counts as a Group B requirement

 

 

 

ITAL  455:  Italian Detective Fiction and Film    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Meredith Ray

 

 

 

 

 

This course focuses on the origins and development of Italian detective fiction, from the first mass-market gialli published in the 1930s to the present-day popularity of Camilleri’s Inspector Montalbano. We will explore how crime-writing is used to confront issues of justice, morality, politics, and regional identity in the Italian context, and how this genre conveys and questions ideas about knowledge, meaning, and “truth.” In addition to reading a selection of short stories and novels, we will also view film adaptations of several works in order to investigate the different functions and capacities of the detective story as cinema.

 

 

Prerequisite: any two 300-level courses
Honors Credit available.

 

 

 

Japanese

 

 

 

JAPN  201-010/080:  Advanced Intermediate Japanese I    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Mutsuko Sato

 

 

 

 

 

This course covers the first six chapters of Genki II text book. Students learn to use various grammatical forms to convey different nuances. Classes are conducted mostly in Japanese. Activities include oral, reading and writing exercises on various topics. About 90 additional Kanji will be introduced.

 

 

Prerequisite: JAPN107.
Textbook: Genki II

 

 

 

JAPN  202-010/080:  Advanced Intermediate Japanese II    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Mutsuko Sato

 

 

 

 

 

This course covers the last five chapters of the Genki II textbook. Students learn to use various grammatical forms to convey different nuances. Classes are conducted in Japanese. Activities include oral presentations and essays on various topics. About 75 additional Kanji will be introduced.

 

 

Prerequisite: JAPN 201 or 206
Textbook: Genki II (Chapters 19-23)

 

 

 

JAPN  204-010/080:  The Art of Japanese Calligraphy    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Chika Inoue

 

 

 

 

 

This is an introductory course in the art of Shodo, Japanese calligraphy. Students will learn the esthetics and styles of traditional calligraphy through exposure to works done by masters and develop basic brush technique through rigorous practice. Once the rudimentary technique is mastered, students will move on to Japanese Kana poems, such as haiku and tanka, and Chinese Kanji poems. Abstract shodo is also explored. Basic history and theories of calligraphy are introduced through student presentations.

 

 

Prerequisite: JAP105 or knowledge of Chinese characters.
Students must purchase their own supplies.

 

 

 

JAPN  305-010/080:  Japanese Conversation & Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Chika Inoue

 

 

 

 

 

This is a course designed for students who want to achieve a high level of fluency. Mastery of basic grammar prior to taking this course is essential. Activities will focus on making one’s language more natural and native-like, in its use of various grammatical forms, idiomatic and set phrases, different formality levels, Kanji and vocabulary. Activities emphasize giving descriptions and expressing opinions, in both written and spoken Japanese. Final grade is based on: chapter exams, oral exams, weekly presentations on current news topics and weather, and a final project.

 

 

Prerequisite: successful completion in three 200-level Japanese courses or equivalent.
Textbook: TOBIRA: Gateway to Advanced Japanese: Chapter 2,4,6,8

 

 

 

JAPN  405-010/080:  Japanese Translation: Theory and Practice    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Rachael Hutchinson

 

 

 

 

 

This course explores both the process of translation and the nature of Japanese literature. As well as translating excerpts from Nagai Kafū’s Furansu monogatari (1909), a text currently unavailable in English, students will also have the opportunity to compare the text and writing style to other works of Meiji literature. Students will discuss major issues involved in translating a literary text from Japanese to English, including the effect of synonym choice, literal versus loose translation, poetic license and the tense-aspect controversy. Students will also gain an appreciation for writing style in terms of sentence construction, kanji use, poetic language and the effect of literary quotation. Students will improve and polish their translation skills to a high degree, and will be encouraged to find their own method of translation, balancing creative expression with accuracy and fidelity to the original text.

 

 

Prerequisite: Two 300-level JAPN courses

 

 

 

Portuguese

 

 

 

PORT  316:  Intensive Portuguese for Spanish Students, II    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Daiane Tamanaha de Quadros

 

 

 

 

 

PORT 316 is a continuation of PORT 216. Students will continue to refine their command of the four language skills—listening, speaking, reading, and writing—and will complete the study of the basic grammatical structure of Brazilian Portuguese. As in PORT 216, there will be an emphasis on Brazilian culture through films, Power Point presentations, readings, and plenty of Brazilian music.

 

 

Once again, come prepared to groove to the rhythm and lyrics of samba and bossa nova, to speak lots of Portuguese, and to have a lot of fun learning a really cool language!

 

 

PORT 316 is part of Option II of the Spanish major and can count toward the Latin American and Iberian Studies major and minor. It is also part of the Foreign Language Certificate in Brazilian Portuguese.

 

 

Prerequisite: PORT 216 or equivalent.

 

 

 

Russian

 

 

 

RUSS  200:  Russian Grammar Review    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Natallia Cherashneva

 

 

 

 

 

Continue your study of Russian at the 200 level, expanding on the knowledge and developing the skills acquired over previous semesters of study. Students will practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Russian through a variety of activities, following the continued adventures of Tanya, Misha, and co. in the second half of the outstanding textbook Welcome Back. At the same time, you will systematically review and complete your study of the fundamentals of Russian grammar, building a solid foundation for further mastery of the language. All 300-level and 400-level Russian courses will build on what we cover here. Honors credit available.

 

 

Prerequisite: RUSS 107 or equivalent

 

 

 

RUSS  211:  Russian Reading and Composition: Short Fiction    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Natallia Cherashneva

 

 

 

 

 

Read entertaining and interesting 20th-century Russian short stories from a variety of genres (detective fiction, satire, tales of adventure, children’s literature) to improve your reading skills and expand your vocabulary. Discussions will help you improve your speaking and listening skills, while writing exercises will facilitate your mastery of the material and develop your skills in composition. Designed to be taken at the same time as RUSS 200, this course will strengthen your grasp of the grammar covered in that course while allowing you to focus on reading techniques and the construction of the complex Russian sentence. Taking the two courses together will enable you to make a significant and leap forward in learning the language. Honors credit available.

 

 

Prerequisite: RUSS 200, if not taken simultaneously with RUSS 200.

 

 

 

RUSS  325:  Russian Culture and Civilization    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Julia Hulings

 

 

 

 

 

Culture is a system of ideas expressed in linguistic, religious, literary, artistic, social, scientific, and technological forms, fleshed out by creative people. Some of these ideas are constants that persist through change, while others are variable. This course will identify and explore what it means to be "Russian" through such topics as marriage and dating, family life, cuisine, traditions and behaviors, the dacha and banya, environmental concerns, and art, illustrating them with journal and newspaper articles, samples of the works of various Russian writers and artists, and other authentic visual and written materials such as menus, maps, and photographs. This course will deepen students’ understanding of Russia’s past, present, and future while improving their mastery of both written and spoken Russian. To truly understand the complex nature of the culture of such a huge country, oral reports will concentrate on the other major ethnic groups in Russia (which compose approximately 20% of the population) and their approaches to the unit topics.

 

 

Prerequisite: RUSS 200; Meets with the regular section.
Fulfills Group B and Multicultural Requirement
Honors Credit Available

 

 

 

RUSS  440:  Utopias and Dystopias: Russian Science Fiction    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Julia Hulings

 

 

 

 

 

The Russian writer Evgenij Zamyatin depicts a future “world of square roots of minus one” in his banned novel We, written and published in the 1920’s as a response to his impressions of the October Revolution and its aftermath. Scholars agree that this early sci-fi dystopia influenced H G Wells and his 1984, however the roots of science fiction in Russia reach back to the late 18th century when contact with European ways of life were truly established. The utopian “Dream, Happy Society” of 1759 starts our journey with its prophetic proposal of separation of church and state. As we enter the 19th century, Dostoevsky’s provides another depiction of an albeit unearthly utopia in “Dream of a Ridiculous Man,” and Odoevsky’s “Town Without a Name” shows the negative results of scientific rejection of ethics.

 

 

This theme continues into the 20th century in Kuprin’s “Toast” set in the year 2905, when universal harmony is not all it was intended to be, and in Valery Bryusov’s “Republic of the Southern Cross,” where we see the consequences of dictatorship vs. basic human desire. Our exploration of the 20th century will include Zamyatin’s We and grim stories by the Strugatsky Brothers, who are credited with really launching sci-fi as a genre in the Soviet Union after the Khrushchev Thaw. What we dream of and what we see may be two entirely different things, and even the most careful attention to logic and reason can go very wrong.

 

 

Prerequisites: one 300-level course; Meets with the regular section.
Available for Honors credit.

 

 

 

Spanish

 

 

 

SPAN  200:  Spanish Composition and Grammar    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Hans-Jörg Busch
Lee Glen
Fatima Haq

 

 

Stacey Hendrix

 

 

 

 

 

An intensive study of selected grammatical topics (ser-estar, preterit and imperfect, present subjunctive and commands), vocabulary, grammatical exercises and short compositions.

 

 

In this course you will acquire new vocabulary, broaden and improve your knowledge of grammatical structures (agreement, verb tenses, pronouns, and much more). You will learn strategies for developing and refining your written communication skills.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 107
Offered with an Honors section (080)

 

 

 

SPAN  201:  Spanish Reading and Composition    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Lee Glen
Cristina Guardiola
Susan McKenna

 

 

 

 

 

This course places major emphasis on the development of reading, writing and analytical skills while studying literary selections from Spain and Latin America.

 

 

In this course the student has the opportunity to read a wide variety of Spanish and Latin American literature in three genres: poetry, narrative and drama. The student will develop reading skills as well as a solid knowledge of the literary terms and movements which will be encountered in more advanced literature classes. Compositions will be based on interpretation of the readings and will be directed towards reinforcing the use of literary terminology.

 

 

This class may contain a section with an Honors component. Honors students may be asked to participate in weekly discussion threads through Canvas, memorization of poems, and/or a short drama performance.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 200
Fuliflls Group "A" requirement.

 

 

 

SPAN  205:  Spanish Conversation: A Cultural Approach    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Joan L. Brown
Carmen Finnicum
Krystyna Musik

 

 

Tomás McCone

 

 

 

 

 

This course is designed to build mastery of practical spoken Spanish in its cultural context. The language will be used strategically – to accomplish objectives and resolve conflicts – in situations that relate to everyday life. Linguistic and cultural topics include travel, relationships, food, health, education, sports, entertainment, housing, and jobs. An array of proven language-learning methodologies will be used to build competence. These include role-playing activities, vocabulary expansion, cultural readings, films, oral reports, Internet research, listening activities, pronunciation practice, grammar repair and review, short compositions, and an individual final project. The Honors section features additional mastery activities inside and outside the classroom.

 

 

Prerequisite: Spanish 107 with a grade of B. Not intended for native speakers. May not be taken if the student has reached the 400 level in Spanish.

 

 

 

SPAN  300:  Advanced Spanish Composition & Grammar I    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Antonio Manjón-Cabeza Cruz
Asima Saad-Maura

 

 

 

 

 

This course is a comprehensive study of basic and complex grammatical structures with both oral and written practice to facilitate further mastery of vocabulary and structures. Cultural topics are explored through readings that raise awareness of the Hispanic world while building up vocabulary to express abstract ideas.

 

 

Prerequisites: SPAN 200 and SPAN 201

 

 

 

SPAN  302:  Survey of Spanish Literature: 18th through 20th centuries    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Susan McKenna

 

 

 

 

 

This course will cover Spanish literature from the 18th century to the present, including selections of representative works, discussions and collateral readings.

 

 

In this course we will explore the literature and culture of modern Spain chronologically, from the eighteenth century to the present. We will gain exposure to classic modern authors in every genre of Spanish literature. We also will sample the action, humor, wit and beauty of many other masterpieces, honing critical skills while exploring the evolution of modern Spain. Multimedia enrichment will add to our appreciation of Spanish literature and culture.

 

 

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 201
Fulfills Arts and Sciences ‘Group B’ requirement

 

 

 

SPAN  304:  Survey of Spanish-American Literature    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Persephone Braham
Meghan McInnis-Domínguez

 

 

 

 

 

Representative works in all genres of Latin American literature in the 20th century.

 

 

SPAN304 is a survey of Spanish-American literature that covers from the beginning of the 20th century until the most recent literary manifestations. Reading selections (excerpts) of famous writers (including Nobel Prize winners Gabriela Mistral [1945], Pablo Neruda [1973], Gabriel García Márquez [1982], and Mario Vargas Llosa [2010]) will provide a better understanding of a wide variety of peoples, cultures, and societies of those nations that we call Latin America.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 201

 

 

 

SPAN  305:  Oral Communication    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Jorge Cubillos

 

 

 

 

 

For individuals with a comprehensive knowledge of Spanish grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis on refinement of expression of abstract ideas as well as mastery of practical communication.

 

 

You love Spanish. You would love to travel to Spanish-speaking countries. You can read Spanish and you can communicate but you want to be able to have meaningful Spanish conversation. This course is designed to help you speak Spanish more fluently and expand your vocabulary while learning current issues and customs in the Hispanic world. The goal is to enable you to sustain conversations and express your opinions on diverse topics. The course draws from a variety of resources, including short stories and essays, articles from the Spanish press, slides, videos, and satellite newscasts. Interactive formats such as class discussions, debates, oral presentations and scenarios will be used.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 200
Restrictions: Not intended for native speakers.

 

 

 

SPAN  325:  Spanish Civilization and Culture    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Antonio Manjón-Cabeza Cruz

 

 

 

 

 

Survey of geography, history, art and society of Spain. This course offers a survey of the geography, history, culture, politics and society of Spain. You will study key historical events, from prehistoric times to the most recent developments, as well as cultural movements that have shaped Spanish national identity. The course is conducted in Spanish and the readings are in Spanish.

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 200.
Fulfills ‘Group B’ Arts & Science requirement.
Required for teaching majors.

 

 

 

SPAN  326:  Latin American Civilization and Culture    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Persephone Braham

 

 

 

 

 

This is a student-centered class in which students will research and analyze fundamental aspects of the geography, history, politics and cultural production of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the present. We place particular emphasis on questions of human rights, colonialism and nationalism, intervention, and globalization and migration. This is a process-oriented course, in which students are encouraged to:

  • Discover the historical causes of modern-day problems in Latin America;
  • Improve research and analytical skills;
  • Develop independent learning skills;
  • Master practical academic and presentation technologies

 

 

 

 

Prerequisite: SPAN 200
Fulfills Arts & Sciences ‘Group B’ requirement.

 

 

 

SPAN  401:  Advanced Spanish Grammar II    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Hans-Jörg Busch
Asima Saad Maura

 

 

 

 

 

SPAN401 is not a systematic study of Spanish grammar (that is the purpose of the SPAN 200 and 300 prerequisites for this course). In SPAN401 students will practice and apply what they have learned in previous courses, as well as broaden their vocabulary through different kinds of writings (i.e.: summaries, opinion papers, narrations, feature articles, descriptions, poems, short stories, etc.), projects and class participation. Furthermore, they will have the opportunity to study and practice more in-depth those structures that traditionally cause the most problems: subjunctive vs. indicative, past tenses, prepositions and pronouns, reflexivity, active vs. passive, text progression, determination, word order, direct vs. indirect speech, sequence of tenses, use of complex tenses, etc. The SPAN 401 textbook contains an array of authentic readings about the culture, history, and politics of Spain and Latin America. The overall goal of SPAN 401 is to help students reach the ACTFL Language Testing Advanced-Low Level.

 

 

Prerequisite: This course is the last in a series of Spanish language courses. Students must have taken SPAN 200 and SPAN 300 before enrolling for this course. The course is conducted in Spanish.

 

 

 

SPAN  415/615:  Latin American Literature and its Political Context: Human Rights in Latin American Litera    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Gladys Ilarregui

 

 

 

 

 

This is the second time that a class in Human Rights in Latin American literature will be offered. The challenge of this class is to address major works in relation to contemporary political and social struggles in Latin America. New voices, from both texts and contexts, will be part of our exploration as we try to unfold the indigenous and civil movements, the discourse of which prompted new voices in theatre, film, poetry and narrative. This is the perfect class for any student enrolled in Political Science, Psychology, Women’s Studies, and other majors that are directly linked to the profound potentiality of these realities portrayed by these texts. Countries to be studied include Peru, Bolivia, Central America, and—if time allows—various issues in southern countries. Coursework will include oral presentations, exams, and a final project.

 

 

 

SPAN  440/640:  Loves, Life and Tragedy    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Alexander Selimov

 

 

 

 

 

The title should read “Love, LIES and Tragedy: from Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda’s Love letters to the Esmeralda Santiago’s Turkish Lover,” as it explores the theme of Love and Betrayal in the context of the development of the modern concept of romantic passion. The assignments list includes films, theatrical pieces, a novel and private love letters.

 

 

(Includes Pelayo by Quintana / Don Alvaro o la Fuerza del sino / Don Juan Tenorio, and/or other works from the M.A. reading list)

 

 

Prerequisite: One SPAN 300-level survey of literature course

 

 

 

SPAN  447-080:  Contemporary Hispanic Fiction by Women    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Joan Brown

 

 

 

 

 

This course explores outstanding contemporary fiction by women writers from Spain and Latin America. From a gender-bending short story to a supernatural memoir to a gripping war novel, these works provide a window into life and literature in Spain, Argentina, Chile and Puerto Rico. The primary goal of the course is to analyze outstanding works as individual literary creations, while situating them in their literary, historical, and cultural contexts. An ancillary goal is to build individual skills in Spanish. The emphasis is on intensive reading (fewer works covered in depth), personalized writing practice, and discussion. This is a stand-alone honors course that meets with a small M.A.-level graduate section.

 

 

Prerequisite: One 300-level survey of Spanish literature.
Fulfills the University Multicultural requirement.

 

 

 

SPAN  455-010:  Economic Inequalities in Latin America    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Gladys Ilarregui

 

 

 

 

 

Economic inequalities in Latin America uses film, poetry, and novel to explore the historic roots and modern persistence of economic inequalities within the geographic boundaries south of the Rio Grande. Topics may include the exploitation of indigenous peoples, the slave trade, and the systemic dehumanization of the human spirit prompted by unregulated capitalist policy in Latin America.

 

 

 

SPAN  455/655-011:  19th Century Prose: Mystery, Fantasy and Gothic Horror    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Alexander Selimov

 

 

 

 

 

“Mystery, Fantasy and Gothic horror” is the title of this course. Students will explore the relationship between sexuality and power, love and hate, life and death in a collection of outstanding short stories by various Latin American and Spanish authors of the 19th and 20th centuries.

 

 

(Including Leyendas by Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, and/or other works from the M.A. reading list).

 

 

 

SPAN  462/662:  Masters of the Latin American Short Story    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cynthia Schmidt-Cruz

 

 

 

 

 

This course will consist of an in-depth study of four major short story writers of Latin America: Juan Rulfo, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, and Gabriel García Márquez; we will also analyze selected stories by women writers such as Clarice Lispector, Elena Garro, and Cristina Peri Rossi. Class discussion will focus on the obsessive themes and writing techniques of these authors. From the cosmopolitan ambiance of Buenos Aires to rural Mexico and the steamy tropical coast of Colombia, these masterpieces of short fiction offer a fascinating insight into Latin America.

 

 

 

SPAN  475-010:  Graphic Transgressions    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Phillip Penix-Tadsen

 

 

 

 

 

This course examines the breakthrough movements that have transgressed traditional boundaries in Latin American art and culture in the 20th and 21st centuries, focusing on literary and poetic breakthroughs and their relationships to the visual arts, especially abstraction, conceptualism, and political activism in contemporary Latin American cultural production. Students develop the ability to analyze cultural behaviors and attitudes across different regions and time periods, reflect on the role of the United States in the international art world, and gain a greater understanding of the relationships between contemporary culture in Latin America and throughout the globe.

 

 

 

SPAN  475-011:  Media Savy Populism: From Che to Chavez: Discourse and Politics in Contemporary Lat. Am    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Phillip Penix-Tadsen

 

 

 

 

 

From the Cuban revolution til the presidency of Hugo Chavez (and others in present-day Latin America), populist political movements have used multiple media in their attempts to revolutionize the life of the people ("el pueblo"). This course focuses on the use of essays and public speeches, fiction, television, film, internet production and other audiovisual productions within populist movements to transform the political atmosphere of many Latin American countries.

 

 

Prerequisites: Any of the following: SPAN307, SPAN308, SPAN325, SPAN326

 

 

 

SPAN  491:  Latin American Capstone: La Canción de protesta: Music, Religion and Revolution in Lat. Am    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Alexander Selimov

 

 

 

 

 

What is the contribution of music to the process of shaping political and social identities in Spain, Latin America and the Caribbean during the second half of the 20th century? How instrumental is the work of politically engaged songwriters for the process of nation-state building in the Hispanic World? These and other related questions will be answered throughout this course, as we will explore the special role music has played in twentieth century politics and culture.

 

 

 

SPAN  647-010:  Contemporary Hispanic Fiction by Women    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Joan Brown

 

 

 

 

 

This course explores outstanding contemporary fiction by women writers from Spain and Latin America. From a gender-bending short story to a supernatural memoir to a gripping war novel, these works provide a window into life and literature in Spain, Argentina, Chile, and Puerto Rico. The primary goal of the course is to analyze outstanding works as individual literary creations, while situating them in their literary, historical, cultural, and critical contexts. An ancillary goal is the development of independent research skills in Spanish. The emphasis is on intensive reading (fewer works covered in depth), personalized writing practice, and discussion. Two novels from the MA Reading List will be covered: El cuarto de atrás by Carmen Martín Gaite and La amortajada by María Luisa Bombal. This graduate course meets with an honors undergraduate section.

 

 

 

SPAN  875-010:  Apocalypse Now? Theory and the Middle Ages    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Cristina Guardiola

 

 

 

 

 

This course engages in truly apocalyptic levels of analyses, which stem from the integration of modern theoretical frameworks onto the culture and literature of the Iberian Middle Ages. Works in the Middle Ages to include the Cantar de mio Cid, Milagros de nuestra señora, Conde Lucanor, La vida de María de Egipto, and various shorter poetic works. Students are expected to present on at least one form of critical literary and/or cultural theory, and explore the ways in which it enables analysis of the medieval work studied.

 

 

 

 

 

SPAN  875-011:  Human Rights and the Culture of Pain    (3 credits)

 

 

 

Gladys Ilarregui

 

 

 

 

 

Human Rights in Latin American literature are expressed in major novels, poetry, and film. These forms of literary and cultural expression address contemporary Latin American political and social struggles. This course focuses on indigenous and civil movements, and is the perfect class for anyone interested in exploring the ways in which humanity struggles to free itself from the bonds of oppression. Countries to be studied include Peru, Bolivia, Central America, and—if time allows—the Southern Cone. Coursework will include oral presentations, exams, and a final project.