Preface

Welcome to graduate studies in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures! We hope you'll find your experience here both intellectually stimulating and professionally rewarding. This handbook is intended to introduce you to the Department, our faculty, staff and students, and to complement the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures Policies and Practices Manual, which also contains helpful information. Please read both thoroughly before you begin your studies at Delaware. This is especially important if you have a teaching assistantship or a graduate assistantship. For University-wide deadlines and regulations, students should also be familiar with the graduate studies sections of the University's Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog.

Table of Contents

Faculty and Staff: Administrative Duties


Ali ALALOU is Sequence Supervisor for French and a member of the Foreign Language Pedagogy Committee. French course coordinators report to him. French graduate students who have issues they would like to have discussed by the French Faculty should see him.

Hans-Jörg BUSCH is Scheduling Officer. Graduate Student teaching assignments are made by him, in consultation with the Sequence Supervisors from French, German and Spanish, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Department Chair.

Jorge CUBILLOS is Sequence Supervisor for Spanish and a member of the Foreign Language Pedagogy Committee. Spanish course coordinators report to him. Spanish graduate students who have issues they would like to have discussed by the Spanish Faculty should see him.

Dorie GALLOWAY is Assistant to the Chair. She is responsible for processing your teaching contracts, seeing you get paid on time, etc.

Cristina GUARDIOLA is faculty liaison with the University of Granada. Students interested in the Granada exchange should see her.

Tomás McCONE is Director of the Foreign Language Media Center. Students seeking assistance with the use of technology in the foreign language classroom should see him.

Diane PARKE is the Graduate Secretary. She assists the Director of Graduate Studies by dealing with many administrative issues and serves as liaison with the Graduate Studies Office. She keeps track of your admission status and your progress towards graduation. She also takes care of book orders. Most of the textbook ordering for elementary and intermediate courses is done by course coordinators and/or sequence supervisors and does not require your involvement.

Bonnie ROBB is Associate Chair of the Department, as well as Foreign Language Education Program Coordinator and a member of the Foreign Language Pedagogy Committee.

Deborah STEINBERGER is Director of Graduate Studies and Chair of the Graduate Studies Committee. She meets once a month during regular semesters with the Graduate Studies Committee, which includes representatives from the French, German, Spanish, and Pedagogy Faculties, as well as a graduate student representative. She is also faculty liaison with the University of Caen. Students interested in the Caen exchange should see her.

Lisa THIBAULT is Sequence Supervisor for German and a member of the Foreign Language Pedagogy Committee. German course coordinators report to her.

Richard ZIPSER is Chair of the Department. All funding decisions and teaching assignments must have final approval by Dr. Zipser. Teaching assistants who wish to be relieved of their teaching obligations on a given day must request his approval in writing. (Approval is granted only in exceptional circumstances.)

Useful Addresses and Phone Numbers

Questions concerning parking permits, student identification cards, billing, transcript requests, course registration, and financial aid concerns may be addressed to:

Student Services
30 Lovett Avenue
831-2131

Students looking for information concerning study abroad programs and internships not only in other University of Delaware departments, but also at other universities, as well as foreign students with questions about their visas and other regulations governing international students should contact:

Institute for Global Studies
26 East Main Street
831-2852

Questions concerning the administrative aspect of graduate life (i.e., GRE information, health forms, health insurance information for teaching assistants, etc.) should be addressed to:

Office of Graduate Studies
234 Hullihen Hall
831-2129

The English Language Institute (ELI) provides intensive English language instruction and tutoring year round. During the summer, all new international teaching assistants are required to participate in a four-week training program (end of July and beginning of August). For details, contact:

English Language Institute
189 West Main Street
831-2674

Students who enter the graduate program without the GRE are required by university regulations to take it in their first semester on campus. Failure to do so will result in withdrawal of funding and expulsion from the program.

Graduate Record Exam
University Testing Center
850 Library Avenue, Suite 104
(302) 831-6717

Foreign Languages and Literatures
Schedule of Departmental Activities

Late August:

Orientation program required for all new faculty and for funded graduate students who are new to the department or who entered the program the previous semester.

September or October:

Welcome reception for graduate students.

October/November and March/April:

Distinguished Scholars Lecture Series. Once each semester, a distinguished scholar is invited to campus to deliver a lecture. A reception follows. Scholars may be from any of the various fields represented in the Department (Spanish, German, French, etc.) and a rotation has been established so that no single field dominates. Graduate students are strongly encouraged to attend these important lectures.

Fall semester:

Workshops will normally be held concerning applying to PhD programs and for Department Summer Grants.

FLLAGS

All full-time graduate students are automatically members of the Foreign Languages and Literatures Association of Graduate Students (FLLAGS). The purpose of FLLAGS is to link the Department's graduate students with each other in order to build a sense of community; to provide a forum for open discussion designed to improve the student experience within the Department; and to serve as a vehicle for action in the interests of the Department's graduate students. Officers are elected in Spring for a one year term beginning in the Fall.

Master's Programs

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures offers two MA programs: the MA in Foreign Languages and Literatures (MAFLL) and the MA in Foreign Languages and Pedagogy (MAFLP). Each program supports major concentrations in French, German, and Spanish; both programs allow students to choose various major/minor and double major concentrations.

  • The two programs have the same entrance requirements but different course distribution requirements, comprehensive examinations, and exam reading lists.
  • All changes of degree track (i.e. between FLL and FLP) or major (including single to double major) must be approved by the Graduate Studies Committee. A student wishing to make such a change should write to the Chair of the Graduate Studies Committee, explaining his or her reasons for wishing to do so.
  • Funded graduate students are expected to pursue graduate-level courses that count towards the MAFLL or MAFLP degree program in which they are enrolled. If a graduate student wishes to enroll in either a graduate course outside the Department, or in any undergraduate course, whether for credit or as a listener, he or she must first explain the rationale for taking the course and secure the written approval of the Director of Graduate Studies or the Chair of the Department.

MA in Foreign Languages and Literatures

This flexible Master's program has three options: a single major (30 credits), major/minor (36 credits), and a double major (42 credits). The program offers students an in-depth study of the target culture(s) and literature(s). Students who complete this program find that the additional exposure to the language and the literature has prepared them for positions requiring target language fluency and general familiarity with the target culture such as teaching, international business, and government. The program also prepares students for study at the PhD. level in foreign literature or (especially in the case of those who elect the major/minor or double major option) in comparative literature.

Major Fields: French, German, and Spanish

Minor Fields: French, German, Spanish, Russian, Latin, and Italian Literatures,
and Applied Linguistics/Pedagogy

  1. Course Work

    1. Single Major (30 credits)

      At least eight courses (24 credits) in the major language/literature; the other two courses may be in the major language/literature, literary theory, or related areas (including FL pedagogy).

    2. Major/Minor (36 credits)

      Twelve courses, including a minimum of eight courses (24 credits) in the major language/literature, and at least three courses (9 credits) in the minor. The twelfth course may be in the language/literature of the major or minor, in literary theory, or related areas (Foreign Language Pedagogy, for example).* In no instance may the student take more credits outside the department than in the department in any one semester.

      Students wishing to pursue a minor must apply for admission to the minor. Criteria for admission are the same as those applied to all other degree candidates. Once admitted to the minor, the student must be assigned an advisor who is a member of the graduate faculty. With the advisor's approval, the student will select courses with the goal of a comprehensive program of study.

    3. Double Major (42 credits)

      Minimum of six courses in the language/literature of each of the two major fields (French, German, or Spanish).

      The remaining two courses may be in one or both of the major languages/ literatures, literary theory, or related areas (including FL pedagogy).*

      * Note: All recipients of a Graduate Assistantship (TAship, RAship, etc.) are required to take Principles of Foreign Language Teaching (FLLT 623).

  2. Comprehensive Examinations

    1. The comprehensive examinations in the student's major area or areas (i.e., French and/or German, and/or Spanish) have a written as well as an oral portion. The examinations are based on coursework and on reading lists available online.

    2. Admission to the oral examination will be granted only to those students who have passed the written examination.

    3. Students who fail the exam may retake it only once. In some cases, where the student fails a portion of the exam that represents less than 50% of the whole, the faculty may require the student to retake only the section(s) failed. Students have the opportunity to do so only once.

    4. For border-line cases, a written assignment may be required by the faculty.

    5. For the minor field, there is no examination, but prior advisement to assure a coherent program is necessary. Students should consult their advisor.

    6. Results of the comprehensive examination will be communicated to the student by the relevant language faculty member on the Graduate Studies Committee and forwarded to the Director of Graduate Studies.

MA in Foreign Languages and Pedagogy

This Master's program has three options: a single major (30 credits), a major/minor (36 credits), and a double major (42 credits). The MA in Foreign Languages and Pedagogy is a flexible degree that can provide students with all the courses required for teaching certification in French, Spanish or German, except for student teaching, which is an undergraduate course of 9 credit hours. Students already certified can take as many as 15 credit hours in foreign language pedagogy courses or closely related fields. All students take at least half their courses in the foreign language and literature of their major field (French, German, or Spanish). This program also prepares students for study at the Ph.D. level in the field of Applied Linguistics.

Major Fields: French, German, and Spanish

Minor Fields: French, German, Spanish, Russian, Latin, and Italian Literatures,
and Applied Linguistics/Pedagogy.

  1. Course work for MAFLP students not seeking certification

    1. Single Major (30 credits)

      1. Foreign Languages and Literatures:
        15 credit hours (normally 5 courses) in the major language/literature. These credits must be earned in the classroom, not as thesis credits.

      2. Foreign Language Pedagogy:
        9 credit hours (normally 3 courses) in the field of foreign language pedagogy. These credits must be earned in the classroom, not as thesis credits.

      3. Related Work
        6 credit hours (normally 2 courses), selected with the prior approval of the student's advisor, from the major language area (French, German, or Spanish), foreign language pedagogy, or related fields, i.e. relevant courses in Education, Linguistics, literary theory, or English, etc.

        All recipients of a Graduate Assistantship (TAship, RAship, etc.) are required to take FLLT 623. If a student has completed course work judged equivalent to FLLT 622, 623 or 624 and can provide documentation (e.g., teaching portfolio, syllabi, teaching certificate), substitutions within the field of FL pedagogy may be accepted.

    2. Major/Minor (36 credits)

      1. Foreign Languages and Literatures:
        Five courses (15 credits) in the major language/literature and three courses (9 credits) in the minor. One course (3 credits) may either be in the major literature or in pedagogy. In no instance may the student take more credits outside the department than in the department in any one semester.

        Students wishing to pursue a minor must apply for admission to the minor. Criteria for admission are the same as those applied to all other degree candidates. Once admitted to the minor, the student must be assigned an advisor who is a member of the graduate faculty. With the advisor's approval, the student will select courses with the goal of a comprehensive program of study.

      2. Foreign Language Pedagogy:
        9 credit hours (normally 3 courses) in the field of foreign language pedagogy. These credits must be earned in the classroom, not as thesis credits (same as 1b).

    3. Double Major (42 credits)

      1. Foreign Languages and Literatures:
        Five courses (15 credits) in the major literature I and five courses (15 credits) in the major literature II. One course (3 credits) may either be in the major literature or in pedagogy.

      2. Foreign Language Pedagogy:
        9 credit hours (normally 3 courses) in the field of foreign language pedagogy. These credits must be earned in the classroom, not as thesis credits (same as 1b).

  2. Course work for MAFLP students on Certification Track

    1. Students who wish to obtain teacher certification must take eleven 3-credit courses for a total of 33 credits, distributed as follows:

      1. Foreign Languages and Literatures:
        15 credit hours (normally 5 courses). These credits must be earned in the classroom, not as thesis credits.

      2. 18 credit hours (six 3-credit courses)
        These courses must include Principles of Foreign Language Teaching (FLLT623, or Methods of Teaching Foreign Language, FLLT/LING 621), Language Syllabus Design (FLLT/LING 622)*, and Second Language Testing (FLLT/LING 624). If the student has taken identical courses at the undergraduate level, other appropriate pedagogy courses (e.g. Methods of Teaching Language in Elementary Schools, FLLT 629), may be substituted. Three 3-credit courses in Education are required: Educational Psychology--Social Aspects (EDUC 613), Educational Psychology--Cognitive Aspects (EDUC 614), and Diversity in the Classroom (EDUC 619). Since not all required courses are offered every semester, careful planning is essential. See the Coordinator of Foreign Language Education for details.

        All recipients of a Graduate Assistantship (TAship, RAship, etc.) are required to take FLLT 623. If a student has completed course work judged equivalent to FLLT 622, 623 or 624 and can provide documentation (e.g., teaching portfolio, syllabi, teaching certificate), substitutions within the field of FL pedagogy may be accepted.

        * Note that FLLT/LING 422 offers a practicum for undergraduate FLE majors to which MAFLP certification trackers are invited. The requirements of the practicum include a clinical placement of 25 hours in a high school. Even if you are not able to attend the practicum on campus, you must complete the 25-hour clinical placement. See the Coordinator of Foreign Language Education, who will arrange for your placement.

      3. 9 credit hours of Student Teaching (EDUC 400)
        completed during a fifth semester after obtaining the MAFLP Degree. Applications for student teaching (available on the UD Teacher Education website) are submitted to the Coordinator of Foreign Language Education in February of the spring semester for all placements in the following academic year ( i.e. you would apply in February 2010 for a student teaching placement in fall 2010 or spring 2011).

        NOTE: As you complete your pedagogy course work and student teaching, you will be compiling a teaching portfolio. See required portfolio elements.

    2. Comprehensive Examinations

      1. The comprehensive examinations in the student's major area or areas (i.e., French and/or German, and/or Spanish) and in Foreign Language Pedagogy have a written as well as an oral portion. The examinations are based on coursework and on reading lists available online.

      2. Admission to the oral examination will be granted only to those students who have passed the written examination.

      3. Students who fail the exam may retake it only once. In some cases, where the student fails a portion of the exam that represents less than 50% of the whole, the faculty may require the student to retake only the section(s) failed. Students have the opportunity to do so only once.

      4. For border-line cases, a written assignment may be required by the faculty.

      5. For the minor field, there is no examination, but prior advisement to assure a coherent program is necessary. Students should consult their advisor.

      6. Results of the comprehensive examination will be communicated to the student by the relevant language faculty's member on the Graduate Studies Committee and forwarded to the Director of Graduate Studies.

MA Comprehensive Examinations

  1. Checklist for Taking Comprehensive Examinations and Graduating

    1. For May Graduation:

      1. 14 February:
        Deadline for submitting the Application for Advanced Degree Form to the Graduate Office. This form should be submitted to the Director of Graduate Studies in each semester comprehensive exam(s) is/are to be taken.

      2. 27 February:
        Deadline for submission of personalized reading list, as specified by degree program and language, to all of the tenured and tenure-track members of the appropriate language faculty.

    2. For December Graduation:

      1. 14 September:
        Deadline for submitting the Application for Advanced Degree Form to the Graduate Office. This form should be submitted to the Director of Graduate Studies in each semester comprehensive exam(s) is/are to be taken.

      2. 28 September:
        Deadline for submission of personalized reading list, as specified by degree program and language, to all of the tenured and tenure-track members of the appropriate language faculty.

  2. Administration

    1. Comprehensive examinations may be taken no earlier than the semester during which the relevant required coursework will be completed. (For regular full-time students this will normally be no earlier than the third semester for pedagogy exams and the fourth semester for literature exams.)

    2. Administration of literature comprehensive examinations (including scheduling, construction, proctoring, and grading) will be the responsibility of the language faculty representative to the Graduate Studies Committee and the tenured and tenure-track faculty of the language/literature major.

    3. The pedagogy portion of the MAFLP comprehensive examinations will be constructed, proctored, and graded by the foreign language pedagogy faculty. Scheduling will be coordinated with the language faculty representative.

    4. The comprehensive examinations are offered once during the fall semester and once during the spring semester. All literature exams will be administered as follows: Fall: mid-November to mid-December; Spring: mid-April to mid-May. For Pedagogy exams, see II.B3.

    5. Normally all students majoring in a particular language/literature will take the written comprehensive examination on the same day. The tests, however, can be tailored to the individual student. The oral examination may be administered on the same day as the written examination, or at a later date.

    6. Students who fail all or part of the MA comprehensive exams may retake the exam (or part thereof) only once.

    7. In unusual circumstances, a one-semester extension may be granted upon written appeal to the Graduate Studies Committee. Those students who elect to delay completion of requirements for the MA degree must 1) request permission by writing a letter to the Director of Graduate Studies explaining their reasons for requesting an extension; and, 2) pay a sustaining fee each semester until they graduate. University regulations require that all work must be completed within five years of initial enrollment in the program.

  3. Reporting the Results of the MA Comprehensive Exams

    Within one week of the administration of both the written and oral parts of the comprehensive examinations (pedagogy and literature), the respective representative(s) to the Graduate Studies Committee will report the results of the exam to the candidates and to the Director of Graduate Studies. However, in cases where the written exam is a clear failure that cannot be redeemed by a strong oral exam, students will be notified of this and will not take the oral exam.

  4. Detailed Information by Language

    1. French

      The examination for the Master's degree in Foreign Languages and Literatures is offered in November/December and in April/May of each academic year. It emphasizes not only the content (plot, setting, characters, etc.) of each work but also its implicit values and its aesthetic and philosophical underpinnings. An understanding of the contribution of each work to its own period is essential. Students should have a grasp both of the major French literary movements and of the cultural and historical context in which they arose. Both the written and oral portions of the exam are conducted entirely in French.

      1. The Written Examination
        All MAFLL students will choose six of the seven periods/areas to prepare for the exam. Students must have taken at least one course in the period/area not selected. The written examination will focus on the Reading Lists for the six periods/areas chosen. It will consist of:

        • Brief identification of six terms, e.g. "mal du siècle," "les bienséances," etc., one for each period/area (60-75 minutes)
        • Longer, focused essay in the period/area of the student's choice (60-75 minutes)
        • Explication de texte chosen from a period other than the one the student has chosen for the focused essay. (60-90 minutes)

        Four hours will be allotted for the examination; the time limit will be strictly observed.

        MAFLP students have a reduced reading list. The literature portion of the written examination is composed of six identifications and an explication de texte. The time allowed for the exam is 2 hours and 40 minutes. (For a description of the FL Pedagogy exam, see section 4 below.)

        In cases where the written exam is a clear failure that cannot be redeemed by a strong oral exam, students will be informed that they may not take the oral. Students who fail all or part of the MA comprehensive exams may retake the exam (or part thereof) only once (please see "Grading of Exam, Notification, and Retake options", below.)

        After the written examination, students are invited to contact French Faculty members for general feedback during the time period that precedes the oral examination.

      2. The Oral Examination
        The oral exam will focus on the Reading Lists for the six periods/areas chosen, course work, and any questions arising from the written examination.

        One hour will be allotted for this portion of the exam.

        Please Note:
        Because the reading lists allow a number of choices, students must inform the tenured and tenure-track faculty in French of their selections by 27 February (for May graduation) or by 28 September (for December graduation). Any requests for substitutions of works on the Reading Lists must be submitted prior to this time to the faculty member responsible for the relevant section of the reading list.

      3. Grading of Exam, Notification, and Retake Options
        The student will receive a grade of Pass or Fail for the entire examination. Shortly after the conclusion of the oral exam, candidates will be informed orally whether or not they have passed the exam. Within one week, candidates will be notified formally of the result. In order to recognize students who perform particularly well on both the written and oral portions of the exam, one of two special mentions, bien and très bien, may be awarded. Students who receive a failing grade for one or more parts of the written or oral exam may have the opportunity to retake the exam or a part thereof. Scheduling is at the discretion of the French Faculty but in all cases will adhere to UD Graduate Study regulations and time frames for the completion of the degree.
    2. German

      The purpose of the MA exam is to test your knowledge of German literature and literary history from 1750 to the present. The exam is based not only on your course work, but also on the literary works which comprise the MA reading list. The information below should help you prepare for this exam.

      1. Exam dates
        The exam will be given toward the end of each fall and spring semester, i.e., in late November/early December and in late April/early May.

      2. Application procedure
        A student wishing to take the exam must indicate this intention in writing to the Chair of the German Faculty by no later than October 1 or March 1. At this time, four copies of the MA candidate's reading list must also be submitted.

      3. Length
        The exam will last five hours and will have two distinct parts: a four-hour written exam and a one-hour oral exam. The oral exam will be given approximately one week after the written exam.

      4. Language
        Native speakers of English and German are expected to take the entire written exam in their native language. Approximately half of the oral exam will be conducted in English, the other half in German. All MA candidates must be prepared to answer questions in both languages.

      5. Format
        The written part of the exam will consist of four sections, as follows:

        • Brief identification of terms (30 minutes).
          Students choose 8 items from a list of 10, for example: "Alliteration," "bürgerliches Trauerspiel."

        • Essay questions (90 minutes).
          Students choose 2 questions from a list of 4, for example: "Discuss the portrayal of women in the bürgerliches Trauerspiel from Lessing to Hebbel."

        • Text analysis (45-60 minutes).
          Students will be given the complete text of a poem, or a passage from a narrative, play, or essay, and asked to analyze it in depth.

        • Longer essay question on a literary epoch (45-60 minutes)
          A sample question would be: "Discuss the importance of the movement known as Young Germany (Junges Deutschland) within the larger context of nineteenth century German literature. Be sure to include in your discussion some of the major works, writers, and features of that movement."

        The oral exam, which will last about one hour, will be conducted by at least three members of the graduate faculty in German and will test your in-depth knowledge of works on the reading list. All MA candidates will be expected to answer specific questions on individual texts and their role within a larger literary-historical context.

        MAFLP students have a reduced reading list. The written exams for students in this program lasts 2 hours and will consist of three sections, as follows:

        • Brief identification of terms. Students choose 6 items from a list of 8
        • Text analysis
        • Longer essay question on a literary epoch

        (For a description of the FL Pedagogy exam, see section 4 below.)

      6. Notification and evaluation.
        Shortly after the conclusion of the oral exam, candidates will be informed orally whether or not they have passed the exam. Within one week, candidates will be notified formally of the result. Students who have passed the exam will receive one of the following evaluations: high pass, pass, or low pass. Students who fail the exam will be given one opportunity to retake it.

    3. Spanish

      The examination for the M.A. degree in Foreign Languages and Literatures is designed to test the student's mastery of the works of Hispanic literature on the M.A. Reading list. It emphasizes not only the content (plot, setting, characters, etc.) of each work but also its implicit values and its aesthetic and philosophical underpinnings. An understanding of the contribution of each work to its own period is expected. Students should have a grasp both of the major Spanish literary movements and of the cultural and historical context in which they arose. The exam is administered in November/December and in April/May of each academic year and has two parts: written and oral. Both the written and the oral portions of the exam are conducted entirely in Spanish.

      1. The Written Examination
        MAFLL students will choose six of seven literary periods/areas to prepare for the exam. Students must have taken at least one course in the period/area not selected. The written examination will focus on the Reading Lists for the six periods/areas chosen. It will consist of:

        • Six short essays/ identifications, one for each period/area. (60-75 minutes)
        • Longer, focused essay in the period/area of the student's choice.
          (60-90 minutes)
        • Textual Analysis: an organized analytical description of a text selected from a period other than the one the student has chosen for the focused essay. (60-75 minutes)

        Four hours will be allotted for the examination; the time limit will be strictly observed.

        MAFLP students will have a reduced reading list and a reduced number of periods/areas to prepare for their Literature examination. Students must have taken at least one course in five different literary periods or areas, and they must select four of those periods/areas for their written examination. (For a description of the FL Pedagogy exam, see section 4 below.)
         
        The written Literature test for MAFLP students will have two parts as follows:
         
        • Four short essays/ identifications, one for each period/area.
          (60-75 minutes)
        • Textual Analysis: an organized analytical description of a text selected by the examination committee from one of the four periods chosen by the student for the part (a). (60-75 minutes)

        Three hours will be allotted for this examination; the time limit will be strictly observed.
         
        In cases where the written exam is a clear failure that cannot be redeemed by a strong oral exam, students will be informed that they may not take the oral. Students who fail all or part of the MA comprehensive exams may retake the exam (or part thereof) only once (please see "Grading of Exam, Notification, and Retake options", below.)

        After the written examination, students may contact Spanish Faculty members for general feedback during the time period that precedes the oral examination.

      2. The Oral Examination
        The oral exam of MAFLL students will focus on the Reading Lists for three out of six periods/areas chosen (randomly selected by the examination committee), course work, and any questions arising from the written examination. 30 minutes will be allotted for this portion of the exam.

        The oral exam of MAFLP students will focus on the Reading Lists for two out of four periods/areas chosen (randomly selected by the examination committee), course work, and any questions arising from the written examination. 30 minutes will be allotted for this portion of the exam.

      3. Grading of Exam, Notification, and Retake Options
        The student will receive a grade of Pass or Fail for the entire examination. Shortly after the conclusion of the oral exam, candidates will be informed orally whether or not they have passed the exam. Within one week, candidates will be notified formally of the result. In order to recognize students who perform particularly well on both the written and oral portions of the exam, the special mention of Honors may be awarded. Students who receive a failing grade for one or more parts of the written or oral exam may have the opportunity to retake the exam or a part thereof the next time it is regularly scheduled.

    4. Foreign Language Pedagogy

      The Foreign Language Pedagogy M.A. Comprehensive examination is based on a reading list and a list of study topics prepared by the members of the Foreign Language Pedagogy faculty, and is administered twice a year, in November and April. It has two parts: a written exam consisting of three concept identification questions (IDs) and a Case Study formulated by the Pedagogy Faculty; and an oral exam also designed to test the student's knowledge of the lists of reading and study topics.

      1. The Written Examination
        For the written exam, students are required to identify three of five concepts from the study topics list, and to discuss a case study according to the guidelines provided by the examiners. A successful candidate must demonstrate knowledge of current pedagogical principles and approaches to foreign language instruction, and have a clear understanding of their historical development. Two hours will be allotted for the examination; the time limit will be strictly observed. Students who fail the written exam will be informed that they may not take the oral. Students who fail all or part of the MA comprehensive exams may retake the exam (or part thereof) only once (please see "Grading of Exam and Retake options", below.) In border-line cases, a written assignment will be required by the faculty.

      2. The Oral Examination
        Normally the oral exam follows within one week after the written exam. The oral exam will focus on questions arising from the written examination.
        Thirty minutes will be allotted for this portion of the exam.

      3. Grading of Exam, Notification, and Retake Options
        The student will receive a grade of Pass or Fail for the entire examination. Shortly after the conclusion of the oral exam, candidates will be informed orally whether or not they have passed the exam. Within one week, candidates will be notified formally of the result. In order to recognize students who perform particularly well on both the written and oral portions of the exam, one of two special mentions, Honors and High Honors, may be awarded. Students who receive a failing grade for one or more parts of the written or oral exam may have the opportunity to retake the exam or a part thereof. In border-line cases, a written assignment will be required by the faculty. Scheduling is at the discretion of the Foreign Language Pedagogy Faculty but in all cases will adhere to UD Graduate Study regulations and time frames for the completion of the degree.

The MA Thesis Option

  1. An MA thesis may be substituted for two courses (6 credits) in the MAFLL or MAFLP programs.

  2. Any well-qualified student (normally defined as one who has not received any grade lower than A-) who has completed 15 hours of course work (or, in unusual circumstances, 9 hours) may explore the possibility of writing a thesis. The student must first seek a tenured professor in the appropriate field who is willing to direct the thesis. Acting in collaboration, the potential director and student will select a second reader for the thesis. This second reader must be a tenured or tenure-track professor. The student submits a written thesis proposal (approximately one page of single-spaced text in length) to the future director and reader, who must give their written agreement to the project. Once this agreement has been obtained, the Chair of the appropriate language faculty and the Director of Graduate Studies must be notified. The student may now register for thesis credit.

  3. Theses may be directed by tenured faculty only.

  4. Once a student is registered, the director suggests a schedule of meetings during the first semester. In these tutorial sessions, the readings selected are discussed and an outline for the paper is established. Advice may be solicited from the second reader. At the end of the first semester, the student writes a report on progress made and outlines a schedule for completion of the work remaining in the second semester. A copy of the report is submitted to the thesis director, the second reader, and the Director of Graduate Studies. The thesis director will assign the student a grade of satisfactory or unsatisfactory.

  5. The director arranges the meetings for the second semester in which the draft of the thesis is examined and revised. Advice may be solicited from the second reader, who reads the draft.

  6. The thesis may be written in either the target language or in English; however, the one-page abstract required by the Graduate School must be written in English. The thesis must follow the guidelines of the latest edition of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (for theses written in the field of Literature) or the American Psychological Association Publication Manual (for theses written in the field of Second Language Acquisition).

  7. The text of theses written in the field of Literature (excluding end notes and bibliography) must be at least 60 pages in length. Note: No length requirements apply to theses written in the field of Second Language Acquisition.

  8. A thesis defense is not required. However, the student may be questioned about his/her thesis during the MA Oral Comprehensive Examination.

  9. The thesis director, second reader, and student should have the latest version of the regulations concerning theses and dissertations issued by the Office of Graduate Studies. All University regulations regarding format, deadlines, etc. must be followed.

  10. The thesis director gives the student an "S" or a "U" for the research portion of the project (first 3 credits) which takes place during the first semester. Upon completion of the thesis, a grade is given. The grade covers the two semesters of work (six credits) and replaces the "S" or "U" given in the first semester. The second reader is not required to sign off on the thesis or to approve the final grade for the project.

  11. A bound hard copy of all completed theses must be delivered to the Graduate Secretary to be deposited in the Department's archives.

Study Abroad

The Department has exchange programs with the Universities of Caen (France), Bayreuth (Germany), and Granada (Spain). Students who go to Caen remain for a full academic year. Students wishing to participate in the programs in Bayreuth and Granada generally stay for one semester only. As a rule, students teach English courses at the foreign site, either at the university or secondary school level. They may also take a limited number of courses towards completion of their MA degree. Participation in the exchange programs is competitive. Students should consult the faculty liaisons for the program in which they're interested (see above "Faculty and Staff: Administrative Duties") one year in advance of the intended stay abroad.

Note 1: Students should be aware that once they have been approved to participate in an exchange program, their campus funding for the semester(s) concerned will be reallocated. Should a student subsequently withdraw from the exchange program, funding will not necessarily be available on campus for the period he or she would have been away.

Note 2: Students must fulfill all contractual obligations at the foreign site. Failure to do so may result in the suspension of further funding.

Transfer Credits

Graduate Studies will accept up to nine credits of graduate-level work in which the student received a grade of at least a B- in the following categories:

  1. Transfer credits in the major field earned at another university.

  2. Transfer credits earned while participating in the exchange programs in Bayreuth, Caen, Granada and future sites. Students will be permitted to earn up to six credits for one semester or nine credits for one year towards their MA at Delaware.

    Please note: Students who have already received the maximum nine hours of transfer credits allowable under University policy may not receive credit for course work done on departmental exchange programs. Regulations governing credit transfer for Departmental exchange programs are as follows:

    1. The credits will be awarded as transfer credits if possible; in this case, the courses for which credit is sought must be approved by the Chair of the student's language faculty. Normally, literature and literary theory courses offered in the target language will qualify for transfer. Once the student has identified the course(s) in which he/she would like to enroll, the student should immediately petition his/her language faculty Chair for approval of the course(s) for which credit is desired. The language faculty Chair will respond in writing as quickly as possible, sending a copy of the approval letter to the Director of Graduate Studies. Proper documentation in the form of a transcript from the foreign institution will normally be required in order to get approval for the credit transfer.

    2. In the absence of a course transcript, credits may also be awarded by examination, but only if prior approval has been granted according to the process outlined above. It is recommended that the examination consist of an oral interview conducted by the language faculty Chair who will ask the student to provide as evidence of course work the course syllabus or program, papers submitted, examinations taken, and a letter from the course professor certifying that the student has done at least good quality (i.e. B) work in the course. The language faculty Chair must then submit a recommendation to the Director of Graduate Studies who will give final approval if it is warranted.

    3. All courses will transfer pass/fail.

    4. Transfer credit will be awarded only for approved courses taken abroad; "life experiences," no matter how rich, do not qualify. Courses that require neither exams nor written papers are not eligible for credit transfer. Nor will independent studies conducted by University of Delaware faculty be approved unless the faculty member is in residence at the foreign site.

  3. Intramural Credit Transfer

    University regulations permit students to transfer up to nine credits from Continuing Education (CEND) to the Graduate School. These courses transfer with grades.

Leave of Absence

Students who wish to take a leave of absence before they have completed their requirements for the MA degree must put their request in writing to the Director of Graduate Studies, who, if it is approved by the Department, will forward it for the approval of the Graduate Studies Office (with a copy to the Chair of Graduate Studies, Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures). During the period of the leave, they do not have library borrowing privileges. No sustaining fee is required. Students should be aware of the fact that the 5 year deadline for completing requirements for the degree is strictly enforced; a leave of absence slows progress towards degree completion and should be requested only in extraordinary circumstances.

Guidelines for Course Selection

  1. Funded graduate students are expected to enroll only in graduate-level courses that count towards the MAFLL or MAFLP degree program that they are pursuing in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. If a graduate student wishes to take a course unrelated to his/her field or take a course at the undergraduate level, either for credit or as a listener, s/he must have the written approval of the FLL's Director of Graduate Studies or the FLL Department Chairperson before enrolling.

  2. All courses must be chosen in consultation with the advisor and should represent as broad a perspective on the major literature as possible (i.e. students should avoid taking too many courses in one literary period). While graduate students are allowed by the University to take up to 12 credits a semester, the Department considers 9 graduate credits to be a reasonable course load for students working as TAs, RAs, or in the Media Center. A student wishing to take 12 graduate credits in a semester should consult first with his/her advisor.

  3. One course = three credits. Funded students must average at least 5 courses per year over the two year grant period. (FREN 533 and GRMN 533, French and German for Reading Knowledge, do not count towards these minima). Semesters spent on the exchange programs are not considered to be part of the funding period.

  4. Graduate seminars (courses numbered 875) in the student's major language are obligatory each semester for all full-time students. Unlike 600-level courses which admit advanced undergraduates, these courses are open only to graduate students. A waiver of this requirement may be granted under the following circumstances:

    1. An identical course has been taken at the undergraduate or graduate level (this would apply, for example, to narrowly defined subject matter, such as single-author courses)

    2. There is a direct conflict with another required course for which there is no allowable substitute, and which the student will not have the opportunity to take in a subsequent semester

    3. In the case of double majors or major-minors: two 875 courses are offered at the same hour

    4. Double majors or major-minors in the FLL Program or in the FLP Program have completed their course requirements in the foreign literature in question.

    Students should put their request in writing to the Director of Graduate Studies, who will consult with the 875 professor before granting (or denying) the waiver.

  5. Students are discouraged from requesting independent study courses. However, in exceptional circumstances in which an independent study seems appropriate, students may request permission to take such a course. Their request must be put in writing and addressed to the Department Chair. They should indicate why they need to take the independent study course, who will supervise it, and what the topic is.

  6. Teaching Assistants who enter the program in September must take Principles of Teaching Foreign Languages (FLLT 623) in their first semester, unless the student has taken an identical course as an undergraduate. Students who enter in mid-year must take the course the following September. Only those students who are enrolled in or have previously taken FLLT 623 will be allowed to teach.

    (Exception: students who have taken FLLT 621 and have participated in orientation may also teach).

    All recipients of a Graduate Assistantship (TAship, RAship, etc.) are required to take FLLT 623. If a student has completed course work judged equivalent to FLLT 622, 623 or 624 and can provide documentation (e.g. teaching portfolio, syllabi, teaching certificate), substitutions within the field of FL pedagogy may be accepted.

  7. Students receiving financial aid from the Department must take at least 50% of their course credits in the Department each semester.

  8. Credits earned in FREN 533 and GRMN 533 (French and German for Reading Knowledge) may not be counted towards completion of the 30, 36, or 42-credit (depending upon option selected) MA degree in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures.

  9. Students may not take for graduate credit a course that has already been taken for undergraduate credit. (Example: if you've taken GRMN 422 "Age of Goethe" you may not take GRMN 622 "Age of Goethe.")

  10. Students in the MAFLP (Masters of Foreign Languages and Pedagogy) program or those in the MAFLL (Masters of Foreign Languages and Literatures) program with a single major have a 30-credit requirement for the MA. Students on stipend (i.e., those with teaching or other responsibilities within the Department) are advised to plan their coursework in consultation with their advisors, so that they need take only two courses in their final semester, to allow themselves time to prepare for the MA Comprehensive Examination. Students pursuing the major-minor option of the MAFLL degree or MAFLP will have to take three courses per semester for each of the four semesters in order to finish on time.

  11. Students who wish to change their program in any way (FLP to FLL or vice versa, the addition or substitution of a minor, etc.) must address their request in writing to the Director of Graduate Studies.

Financial Aid

Financial Aid, in the form of Teaching Assistantships, Graduate Assistantships, and Tuition Scholarships is offered to qualified students already admitted to the program according to established departmental policies and procedures. Students should be aware of certain restrictions and limitations imposed upon their award:

  1. Aid (assistantships, fellowships, and scholarships) is offered only to students whose major or primary field is in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, except for exchange students in connection with our study abroad programs.

  2. Awards are usually renewed for a second year when the student's work (as teacher and as student) is satisfactory. Funding is normally limited to two years. Students who go abroad for a semester or a year are not considered funded during the time abroad. Thus, a student who has one year on campus as a teaching assistant, a graduate assistant, or a tuition scholar, then goes abroad for a semester, will still be eligible for two semesters of funding upon his/her return. However, students cannot be funded for any given semester unless they need at least six credits of graded graduate courses in order to complete the requirement for the degree. Hence, the student who takes five courses in the first year and then earns six credits (two courses) during a semester abroad, will be funded for only one additional semester upon his/her return.

  3. Students who enter the graduate program with six or more transfer credits (from CEND or another institution) will normally be entitled to a maximum of three semesters of funding.

  4. While an extension may be granted under special circumstances, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures is not obligated to fund or otherwise support students in their third year if they have not completed all requirements for the MA degree. In case of vacancies for instruction at the 100-level, the Department will try to find other candidates before rehiring graduate students who have not completed the MA degree requirements.

  5. Students who elect a double major are eligible for a fifth semester of funding. They may also seek to complete their degree in two years by taking advantage of the thesis option.

  6. Students who receive 100% of the minimum stipend and a 100% tuition scholarship may not hold additional employment on or off campus. As with any professional appointment, the amount of service may vary from week to week, but the average is usually expected to be no more than 20 hours of service per week for the U.D. minimum stipend. Students seeking an exception to this policy should petition the department's Director of Graduate Studies, who will consult with the Department Chair. Should they decide to support the student's request, the petition will be forwarded to the Dean's Office of the College of Arts and Science. Dean's permission is required for any exception to this "no other employment policy" and APPROVAL BY THE DEAN must be forwarded to the Office of Graduate and Professional Education.

Deadlines for Advanced Degree Application

While preparing for the comprehensive examinations, the student should be cognizant of the following deadlines: the deadline for degree application is September 15 for December degree conferral, February 15 for May degree conferral, and May 15 for August degree conferral. The application, attainable from Diane Parke (103 Jastak-Burgess Hall) or from the Office of Graduate Studies, 234 Hullihen Hall, needs to be returned to the Graduate Studies Office following payment of the application fee (Master's fee is $35) and the attainment of proper departmental signatures. The administrator for Graduate Student Academic Affairs does not sign the application until all degree requirements have been met. It is important to remember that if a student does not meet the application deadline for his/her desired graduation date, the graduation date will be changed to the next term. In this event, the student is not required to reapply or pay another application fee.

Advisement

  1. All students are assigned to an academic advisor in their major field(s) when they enter the program. MAFLP students whose language is French or Spanish will have two advisors. MAFLP students on certification track should also seek advisement from the Foreign Language Education Program Coordinator (currently Professor Robb).

  2. The principal duties of the advisors are to explain program options to their advisees, to discuss the possibility of writing a master's thesis, to present the opportunities for studying abroad via the University's exchange programs, to help the students to obtain all the transfer credits to which they are entitled, and to inform their advisees about course load and course selection regulations in order to develop the soundest program possible for the student.

  3. Advisees should not hesitate to contact their advisor(s) concerning questions, comments, or suggestions they may have in reference to their program of study.

  4. If a student wishes reassignment to another advisor, the request must be submitted in writing to the Director of Graduate Studies.

Library Research

The University's Morris Library offers the following research services for Graduate Students:

  • DelCat
    An on-line service which provides quick reference to books and other resource materials currently shelved in the library on a variety of subjects and authors. This service may be accessed using terminals available at the library, any other on-campus computer site, and from the dormitories using the student's UNIX account.

  • Modern Language Association International Bibliography
    This bibliography is useful for finding both books and articles relevant to the subject of your research. The print bibliography is located in the Reference Room, on one of the tables to the right as you enter the room. The on-line MLA bibliography is more up-to-date and easier to use. Ask the librarian for help in locating and using these.

  • MLA On-Line
    Should a question arise concerning the format of a research paper or the manner in which a work should be cited, consult the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers and the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing. These manuals are available at the Reference Desk or may be purchased in most local and online book stores. See also the UD Library Citation Style and Format Guidlines, the UD Writing Center's Resources and, the MLA's own Frequently Asked Questions about MLA Style. More information can be found on the MLA web site.

  • Study Carrels
    Graduate students seeking quiet solitary study may apply for a study carrel in Morris Library:

    1. Proceed to the second floor Administrative Office located in Morris Library (831-2231).

    2. Applications are available: two to three pages in length, the applications require student information and the signature of either the Chair of the student's particular Department or the student's advisor.

    3. The completed application needs to be returned to the Administrative Office and requires a week to process.

    4. The student also needs to provide a deposit for the key to the carrel. Upon receipt of the key at the end of the semester, the deposit will be refunded.

  • Return Policy
    The library will loan books to University graduate students for 60 days.

Conferences for Graduate Students

All students, but particularly those who intend to pursue a career in academe, are encouraged to take advantage of opportunities to read papers at professional conferences or to submit their works for publication. MA students may wish to "get their feet wet" by participating in conferences intended uniquely for graduate students. The following is a sample of opportunities available:

  1. Geis Student Research on Women Conference: University of Delaware
    Usually held in the Spring, with proposals due in March, papers in April. Open to all students, female and male, whose topic of research is women or gender-related issues. Papers must be in English. Sponsored by the Women's Studies Program and the Office of Women's Affairs.

  2. Catholic University of America Foreign Language conference in March
    Call for papers in the Fall which may be in either English or the target language. Each paper is limited to a twenty-minute reading time. For more information, contact: Patricia Hannon at (202) 319-5240.

  3. Kentucky Foreign Language Conference
    A professional conference with a day set aside for graduate students. Held in late April. Twenty-minute (10-12 pp.) papers may be read in the French, German, Spanish or English. Check the web page of the University of Kentucky.

  4. University of Pennsylvania, Romance Languages Department
    Held in the Spring, with proposals due in the Fall.

  5. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    Conference on Romance Literatures is held in February, with proposals due in December. A separate sheet of paper needs to be included with the proposals which includes the following information: title of paper, name, academic affiliation, address, telephone number, and e-mail address. Papers may be submitted in any Romance language, but English is preferable. The reading time is limited to 20 minutes (10-12 pages).

Graduate Student Publications

  1. Ariel
    Published by the University of Kentucky. Spanish graduate student publication.

  2. Chimères
    Published each semester by the graduate students of French at The University of Kansas. The editors invite papers (max. 20 pp.) on French literature, language, or culture, written by graduate students and non-tenured PhDs. Submissions must include 1) a copy of the essay; 2) an abstract of 75 words or less; and 3) a diskette. Microsoft Word and MLA Style required. Send submissions to Editor, Chimères, University of Kansas, Department of French and Italian, Wescoe Hall, Lawrence, KS 66045-2120. Questions? Call (785) 864-4056.

  3. Osa Mayor
    Published by the University of Pittsburgh. Spanish graduate student publication.

  4. Paroles Gelées
    Published by the University of California at Los Angeles, this annual journal accepts articles on French and Francophone literature, language and culture, and those which analyze the relationship(s) between these and other disciplines. Submissions in either English or French are accepted, but, should be limited to 25 pages in length. The articles must conform to MLA standards. A total of three copies of the article may be mailed to: Paroles Gelées, University of California, Los Angeles, Department of French, 2326 Murphy Hall, Box 951550, Los Angeles, California 90095-1550. Manuscripts are accepted year round.

  5. Tropos
    Published yearly by Michigan State University. Manuscripts should not exceed 20 pages. TROPOS welcomes material relevant to the study of any aspect of Romance and Classical Languages, literatures or civilizations. Manuscripts may be in English or the target language. Manuscripts (two hard copies) should be submitted to TROPOS, Dept. of Romance and Classical Languages, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824-1027. Use MLA Handbook for style.

Non-University Grants and Fellowships

Golden Key Scholars
Five $10,000 scholarships are awarded yearly to graduate students. The selections are based on outstanding academic achievement, exemplary leadership, and commitment to service. It is also required that the applicant be an alumnus of an undergraduate institution of not more than three years, and an active member of his/her Golden Key chapter. For further information, contact the Society Headquarters at 1-800-377-2401. Additional scholarship information is available to current/former Golden Key members by writing to:

Golden Key National Honor Society
Member Services
1189 Ponce de Leon Avenue
Atlanta, Georgia 30306-4624

Awards

The Theodore E. D. Braun French Graduate Student Award
The Theodore E. D. Braun French Graduate Student Award, a prize of at least $100 and a certificate, is given to a graduating MA student in French who has performed with distinction in the classroom, on the comprehensive examination, and (where applicable) as a teacher in our program.

The German Graduate Student Award
The German Graduate Student Award, a prize of at least $100, is given to a graduating MA student in German who has performed with distinction in the classroom, on the comprehensive examination, and (where applicable) as a teacher in our program.

The Spanish Graduate Student Award
The Spanish Graduate Student Award, a prize of at least $100, is given to a graduating MA student in Spanish who has performed with distinction in the classroom, on the comprehensive examination, and (where applicable) as a teacher in our program.

Awards for Distinction in Teaching
Letters of commendation for stellar teaching are sent once yearly in the spring to the Department's outstanding teaching assistant(s) in each language, providing that appropriate candidates can be identified. To be eligible for the award, students must have taught for at least two semesters in the Department. Selections, made by the Graduate Studies Committee and based upon TA observation reports and student evaluations, are submitted to the Sequence Supervisors for their approval. Students may not receive this award more than once.

FORMS